Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.


Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8’s. Everything else was kept the same as Ana’s plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.
In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.

Disclaimer: Although it is my intention to provide accurate plans and clear instructions, not all plans have been tried and tested. Using plans or information found on SawdustGirl.com indicates that you agree with the Terms of Use policy and will accept full responsibility for the process and outcome of any project you attempt. All plans are for private use only. Plans and information published on SawdustGirl.com may not be reproduced, republished or distributed in any manner without written permission from Sandra Powell, Sawdust Girl. Actual projects built using Sawdust Girl plans may be published on your own site without instructions or "tutorial" as long as you provide a link to my original post with full post title or "SawdustGirl.com" as link title.
It's nice to be on your site getting plans and building projects.  I was so inspired by you I went out and bought Ryobi tools, and have since built 3 projects all on http://www.Ana-White.com/ by you.  I loved building the Potting Table, and better yet my Mother loved it when I gave it to her as a gift.  I am now working on the Farm House style Table and Benches.  I can't wait to see how they turn out!  

In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.
Have you ever seen wooden slippers? These are the slippers which you can gift someone and they are very comfortable. You can make them very easily. While giving the gift you always want something unique. These are the unique slippers and you can wear these slippers in your home too. You can use them as a decoration piece and while going into the lawn you can have them. Have a look at the pictures which I am sharing with you, I hope you would like these pictures.
We will suggest you select the simple Birdhouse if you are new at woodworking but be sure to select its design with respect to the place where you are going to hang/place it. One of our simple Birdhouse tutorials will help you building one. We have managed to include a source tutorial below that will help you to understand illustrates and the instruction to building a simple Birdhouse.
Having swing in your own home, yard or garden can be so de-stressing and be relaxing a thing to enjoy, that doesn’t matter you have a big yard or patio, or vacant porch. Kids will surely fall in love with this swing porch and love playing on a breezy day. Even, adults also do relax and enjoy a quite morning coffee, or just being embraced by the sun in the swing.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
I few years ago I made a build plan for Remodelaholic for a super adorable House Frame Bed. The build plan was inspired by this darling room shared by an Australian magazine, Home Life.  Over the years a few requests have been made for a full size mattress version. Here it is --> How to Build a House Frame Bed - Full Size This bed is designed to fit a full mattress 53" x … [Read more...]
Methods for skinning a cat have nothing on ways to build a bench. Explore different joinery methods and work with those that you are able to complete the best. Don't overcomplicate something when it doesn't need to be. There's a reason tools have improved, glue has gotten better, fasteners stronger, and new joinery methods have been introduced. A lot of the time the focus in woodworking is on finding shortcuts to get the same or better results. Don't let joinery snobs influence you.
Learning from the ideas of other woodworkers, while avoiding their mistakes is an excellent way to design and set-up your own shop layout. Setting up a woodworking shop as a hobby place, or for a some one more serious, who even may venture off into some sort of woodworking business; is not as easy as it might sound. Knowing the correct steps to follow will save you time and money, but it will also save you a lot of stress down the road.
Disclaimer: Almost any DIY project involves risk of some sort. Your tools, materials, and skills will vary, as will the conditions at your project site. Rogue Engineer has made every effort to be complete and accurate in the instructions provided on this website. Rogue Engineer will not assume any responsibility or liability for damages or losses sustained or incurred in the course of your project or in the use of the item you create. Always follow the manufacturer's operating instructions in the use of tools, check and follow your local building codes, and observe all commonly accepted safety precautions.
And the fact is that you can make your own patio chair with several old but still good pallets. Here we are providing a tutorial that everybody can follow easily – it is very well-written and also self-explanatory, which is great for those who are a beginner at woodworking and have never completed a DIY project before. As you don’t need to be a professional woodworker or a handyman to complete this project, so it is not a difficult task – all you need is a bit of determination!​
If you are in need of a big farmhouse table, select this plan to build your own. Though not a traditional farmhouse table, it is beautiful in the outdoor living area making it ideal for guests. Also, as the table is big enough to suit any size of family, it makes it perfect for large families or when quite a few guests join you for lunch or dinner.
With a little woodworking knowledge and use of some basic items, you can build a wonderful tissue box holder of your own. You can easily build them in bulk and then sell at good rates. Although easy, a wooden tissue box is an equally important and useful item for households. You can also make wonderful variety of wooden boxes easily at home. It is actually very easy and interesting to make. These wooden items give a classy look to your interior furnishing. This is the easiest way to spice up your tables with beautiful wooden tissue boxes. By doing this you can give style to your table settings.
Once the backings are connected, you can append the 4×4 leg runners. In the event that you have a Kreg HD, then you can simply penetrate 3 1/2″ stash gaps into the 4×4's. If not, you can simply connect them with 3 1/2″ Spax screws from the front countenances of the legs into the runners. You can conceal the screw openings, with the equipment, toward the end.
To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.
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