Some friends of ours have been wanting a DIY farmhouse table for some time now. After hearing about their shopping trip and the prices they were looking at spending on one I felt obligated to step in and make this one of my next DIY projects. My buddy Jake has no experience with power tools whatsoever, bless his heart. So, you’re in for a special treat with this one as you will get to see Jake build this table from scratch with no power tool experience! With a little guidance from me of course.

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Wood screws often have a coarse pitch, unthreaded shank (the bit between the head and the tip), and flat heads. The coarse pitch helps the wood screw tap into the wood and make a solid connection. The unthreaded shank is used so that the head can go flush with the wood beneath it without the threads getting in the way. Flat heads are typically used so that the screw can sit flush against the wood. Most wood screws also require a pilot hole, which you should drill with a drill bit prior to screwing the screw into the wood, find a chart on what size hole to drill for what screw here.
Copyright 2018 by Cut The Wood. CutTheWood.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. Additionally, CutTheWood.com participates in various other affiliate programs, and we sometimes get a commission through purchases made through our links.
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The blade on a block plane, (click to enlarge drawing) commonly referred to as a plane iron, is mounted with the bevel side up to produce a cutting angle of about 37 degrees in a standard plane and 25 degrees in a low-angle plane. Some block planes feature an adjustable mouth, which allows the plane to be tuned for different cuts; Close the mouth and lower the blade for finish cuts or open the mouth and extend the blade for thicker rough cuts.
This box is the fifth generation of this design. After each production run of about 20 boxes, I make slight design changes to enhance the look and simplify the machining. Any hardwoods would work, but since the box uses so little lumber, I prefer to incorporate highly figured woods. For safety, ease of construction and consistent cuts, I use a jig for bevel-cutting the legs and another jig for beveling the top surface of the lid.
Creating custom picture frames for friends and family is a great gift giving project that's sure to please even those difficult to shop for gift recipients. Everyone has a special photo or keepsake they've meant to have framed. Making a custom frame to match may be the best gift of the season. Best of all, it's a quick and simple project to complete with the right tools and set up.
A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.

While metal machinists’ straightedges are ideal for setting up woodworking machinery, their high-tolerance accuracy and weight are overkill for most woodworking tasks. For centuries, shop-made wooden straightedges handled many layout and testing chores, and the tools are still useful today. Wooden straightedges are lightweight, simple to make in any size and can be easily trued with common workshop tools. While straightedges that resemble the machinists’ versions – essentially a skinny rectangle with parallel edges – are useful, these tend to go out of square quickly as the seasons change. However, by understanding a bit about the way wood works, you can make a wooden straightedge that is both accurate and durable.
It was murderously hot here in the Charm City suburbs last weekend. The heat index topped a full 115 degrees on Saturday. But fear not, the heat didn’t deter us from tackling our long-awaited shed storage shelves project. We’re excited about this project because we’ve been looking forward to sharing a plywood shelving article for some time now, and this article gives us the perfect avenue for that. In case you’ve forgotten (or more likely if you’ve just started reading here), here’s the new shed. It looks great on the outside, but without some shelving and storage hooks for tools inside, most of the interior space would go to waste.
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