To make the top, align the three pieces of 2 x 12. Fit them as tightly together as you can. Bore four pocket-screw holes through the bottom faces of the top pieces, then spread glue on each adjoining edge. With the pieces clamped together so that the ends are flush, fasten with 2½-inch pocket screws. Glue will squeeze out of the joint. Wait a few minutes for the glue to get rubbery, then shave it off with a sharp chisel. Keep the top flat as it dries—I like to clamp cauls across both ends to add stability. Cauls are 2 x 4s or other pieces of stout wood turned on their edges.
Block planes range in quality and price from hardware-store versions that cost around $35 to high-end brass planes that cost as much as $250. While the higher-priced models are likely to perform better out of the box and include higher-quality machining and parts, low-cost block planes can perform well if tuned up properly using the techniques detailed in this episode.
This table is a little narrower than I would have liked for it's length (34x72), but it's perfectly sized for the space we are using it in.  At 72" long, I would have preferred something closer to 40" wide but this works for us.  The top is made from 16" wide soffet boards from a house I helped tear down when I was 10 yrs old (no, it wasn't the house we were living in).  The old boards have been in the barn for 40 years and needed to be used.  The center painted board is also from the same house.  
This practical entryway storage unit is made from solid wood and is glued together: no nails or screws (apart from those that hold it to the wall) are used. In this case, we made it out of soft maple, but it could be made from any good quality solid wood: pine, oak, birch, fir…whatever best matches the trim or furnishings in the place where it will be mounted to the wall.
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As soon as I came across this tutorial, I didn’t wait any longer to start building one. Some of the items you need for this project are hardwood plywood, saw, glue, nails, drilling machine, etc. The video is very easy to follow for anyone with basic woodworking knowledge and experience. The first source link also includes a step by step procedure in plain English for those, who are not comfortable enough with the video tutorial.The final piece looks like the one in the image. It is absolutely loveable. The design, color and looks can also be modified to suit the surrounding area.


While metal machinists’ straightedges are ideal for setting up woodworking machinery, their high-tolerance accuracy and weight are overkill for most woodworking tasks. For centuries, shop-made wooden straightedges handled many layout and testing chores, and the tools are still useful today. Wooden straightedges are lightweight, simple to make in any size and can be easily trued with common workshop tools. While straightedges that resemble the machinists’ versions – essentially a skinny rectangle with parallel edges – are useful, these tend to go out of square quickly as the seasons change. However, by understanding a bit about the way wood works, you can make a wooden straightedge that is both accurate and durable.
Wall-mounted or placed on a table or countertop, this handsome display cabinet is the perfect way to share any collection while keeping it clean and protected at the same time. Featuring tempered glass doors and three shelves, the cabinet’s design calls for all straight cuts and straightforward construction techniques (simple cut-outs give the effect of
A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.
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10. Drip cyanoacrylate (CA) glue into the ball while holding the cap in place.This will firmly anchor the ball to the cap. To attach the hanging wire (see Sources, below), place a drop of glue on top of the hole and push in the wire. Apply glue to the icicle’s tenon and place it in the bottom hole. Slow setting CA glue works best for oily exotic woods such as rosewood and ebony.

There was a time when working with woodworking was considered a waste of time. That trend has subsided with contemporary interior designing commanding a stiff price. If you have the right skills then you can surely make a career out of your skills but as they say "nothing comes easy". Woodworking is no different. If you don't have the skill, yet, start with these beginning projects.

Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8’s. Everything else was kept the same as Ana’s plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.
Choose a light-colored wood with interesting grain for the ball. It should be one solid piece, 2 1⁄2- to 3-in. square. I like to make more than one ornament at a time, so I use a rough blank about 8-in. long in order to make two balls. Make the cap and icicle from a contrasting dark wood that takes fine details. I like to use rosewood or ebony. You’ll need a piece that’s 1-in. square and 8-in. long.

Build your own furniture, a dream of many but a reality for few. In this video I show you how I make farm tables. This is one made for a customer for a new house. It's 10 feet long and made from red oak, sawn from a dead standing tree. The base is made from spruce and yellow pine. It is constructed with mortise and tenon joints, using a hollow chisel mortiser and a tenon jig I made for the table saw.
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