This free DIY plan is primarily designed for use in outdoors especially in the springtime. Cedarwood is recommended because it can withstand the natural elements and the boards are designed to have gaps between them so that it allows drainage. If you want to make an indoor farmhouse table with this plan, simply use the top design as used in the J-pedestal table and do not keep any gaps between the boards.
If you have a small space in your kitchen or living space but require a table for dining or if you are fascinated with roundtable designs, you can consider this free DIY plan form Lane Home Co. to be a great option. Not only this table looks nice but also it is very sturdy with layered centered cross base in a V-shape. You might feel the table is difficult to make, but if you have the right tools and carefully follow the instructions, you will be able to accomplish the task easily.
Farmhouse tables are generally designed to be large, but this plan from Addicted2DIY is unique for providing a seating capacity of 10 people. For holidays or parties, if you are inviting a lot of guests, your farmhouse table will be a perfect seating for all enjoying meals together. Of course, you need to have that huge space in your kitchen or living area to keep this table.
Pegboard is the master of all workshop organizational tools. You can buy full sheets (4x8) at any big box store, but most also sell smaller, more manageable sheets. And while you can just slap these up on any wall, something like this fold-out wall cabinet will double your storage and keep your tools tucked safely away. You could also try this fancy sliding-door version.

I few years ago I made a build plan for Remodelaholic for a super adorable House Frame Bed. The build plan was inspired by this darling room shared by an Australian magazine, Home Life.  Over the years a few requests have been made for a full size mattress version. Here it is --> How to Build a House Frame Bed - Full Size This bed is designed to fit a full mattress 53" x … [Read more...]
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
×