The most useful stationary tools are a drill press and a table saw. For the longest time, I only had a cheap old contractor saw, and only a very small drill press, but I made do with those. The difference between a good drill press and a cheap drill press is much smaller than the difference between a cheap drill press and no drill press, so don't wait until you can afford the perfect one.
Now you have the knowledge of creating your dream farmhouse table of your choice. With 53 DIY Farmhouse Table Plans, consider choosing anyone which you like. Even if you are not an expert at carpentry, you can select from the simple designs that are equally stylish. If you are great at woodworking, you can consider the projects which require some expertise.
A wooden cutting board can be used in the kitchen for cutting purposes. You can see one in the image above. This wooden cutting board can be built by using wooden pallets from your house. You need only a few items to build this beautiful wooden cutting board. I suggest you to make more than one as they can be used anywhere in the house for many purposes. You can easily make it at home and use it for cutting different things in the kitchen. In addition, it adds a nice visual appeal to your kitchen. Make sure to use only high quality items for any woodworking project.
A luminaria (often called luminary) is a traditional Mexican lantern made from a paper bag with sand and a candle inside. We’ve add some woodworking panache to these outdoor accents and build our luminarias from wood, with box joints and a star-shaped cutout. They’re beautiful — and reusable — ways to brighten patios, steps and walkways this holiday season.

Beginning with this first episode, our video tutorials, related articles, and projects cover all the basics from choosing your first hand and power tools to setting up a workspace. We'll even get you started building your first projects. You can download free woodworking project plans for a handsome cutting board, a plywood workbench that you can build with just a few tools, and an elegant small box.
I few years ago I made a build plan for Remodelaholic for a super adorable House Frame Bed. The build plan was inspired by this darling room shared by an Australian magazine, Home Life.  Over the years a few requests have been made for a full size mattress version. Here it is --> How to Build a House Frame Bed - Full Size This bed is designed to fit a full mattress 53" x … [Read more...]
Getting started in woodworking can seem like a daunting task. From specialty woodworking tools to identifying and understanding the different types of wood, there is so much to know that even the old-timers are still developing. But learning and experimenting are what woodworking is all about. Get started on the right foot with some essential basics about safety, tools, lumber, and traditional layout and measuring techniques. 

​Every project needs some tools and material to build on. The tools and material you will need in this plan include Miter saw, jigsaw, measuring tape screws and screwdriver etc. We will suggest you take high-quality material for the plan. Read the source tutorial and watch the video tutorial below for more details. Follow all the steps properly to make a nice and strong Rustic cooler. The tutorial explains the procedure for building this awesome gift. Make sure to use the only high-quality material for any woodworking project.

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Hand Sanders are the simplest and cheapest sanding you can do and will likely work well for most small projects. You buy the hand sander which is a plate with a handle (typically ~$5) and then attach pieces of sandpaper to the bottom. The biggest advantage to a hand sander is it’s very cheap. It does take a bit of time, but you can achieve a perfectly acceptable finish with it.
As soon as I came across this tutorial, I didn’t wait any longer to start building one. Some of the items you need for this project are hardwood plywood, saw, glue, nails, drilling machine, etc. The video is very easy to follow for anyone with basic woodworking knowledge and experience. The first source link also includes a step by step procedure in plain English for those, who are not comfortable enough with the video tutorial.The final piece looks like the one in the image. It is absolutely loveable. The design, color and looks can also be modified to suit the surrounding area.

Disclaimer: Although it is my intention to provide accurate plans and clear instructions, not all plans have been tried and tested. Using plans or information found on SawdustGirl.com indicates that you agree with the Terms of Use policy and will accept full responsibility for the process and outcome of any project you attempt. All plans are for private use only. Plans and information published on SawdustGirl.com may not be reproduced, republished or distributed in any manner without written permission from Sandra Powell, Sawdust Girl. Actual projects built using Sawdust Girl plans may be published on your own site without instructions or "tutorial" as long as you provide a link to my original post with full post title or "SawdustGirl.com" as link title.


I just discovered your site and I’m enamored! You are truly gifted and I love your style. This post really spoke to me because 1. I have sons too 2. We are just about to re-do our kitchen table 3. I just wrote a whole post about our kitchen table on my website. I feel like the kitchen table really is a sacred place for family and it’s beautiful that you built yours together. If you want to read my kitchen table post, check it out at http://kirstenjoyhobbs.weebly.com/homemaker/the-kitchen-table-a-horror-story. Cheers 🙂
Nominal size means the dimension of the lumber “in name only.” In other words, the lumber is called a certain size, even though its true size is smaller. For example, a piece of lumber is called a 4x4 at the store, even though it is only 3 ½” x 3 ½” if you were to measure it with a ruler.http://www.familyhandyman.com/carpentry/making-sense-of-lumber-dimensions/view-all

Farm tables are those warm, rustic surfaces that draw inspiration from the original harvest tables found in American homes of the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than being built by skilled and trained artisans, farm tables were assembled from large and rough planks of fir. Their construction valued sturdiness and utility over detail and refinery. Today, farm tables can bring a sense of antique charm to any home, complementing matched chairs and contemporary benches alike. Here are five DIY farmhouse table projects to inspire your next act of handyman prowess.
We were so pleased that we bought a quart size to use on the kitchen cabinets. This is the ONLY stain that you can buy which will give you that lovely espresso color. I've tried an "espresso" liquid stain and a "java" liquid stain. I have no idea why they don't work but there is something magic about this gel stain that makes a difference. ... full review
You guys did a great job – and I love that it was a family project! Your boys will probably remember that for the rest of their lives and enjoy sitting at the table because of it! I’ve been trying to convince my husband that I need to make us a nice table for our new house but he’s being stubborn… I’m going to show him your pictures so he can see how awesome it would be! Great job on your blog! I have one too where I talk about all my projects! 🙂
I’ve included the option to purchase the amplified plan for $19.99. The amplified plan is a printable plan that will guide you every step of the way and is packed with tips, tricks, money saving options, and answers to frequently asked questions. I know it’s hard to believe but its got even more helpful info than the plans below! Plus it’s a great way to support this site so we can continue to put out free DIY projects every week!
Woodworking is accessible to people of all ages, skill levels, and budget. Don't expect to be the Wood Whisperer overnight, but there are plenty of woodworking websites that offer free plans and tutorials to help you every step of the way. One of these sites is Chief's Shop from Chris Hill, who has been a woodworker his entire life. He offers some great advice for woodworking newbies, which is also a great reminder for those with a bit more experience:
Beginning with this first episode, our video tutorials, related articles, and projects cover all the basics from choosing your first hand and power tools to setting up a workspace. We'll even get you started building your first projects. You can download free woodworking project plans for a handsome cutting board, a plywood workbench that you can build with just a few tools, and an elegant small box.
Summertime means loads of fun playing games outside with family and friends. We love to bring out yard games like Kubb, Croquet, and Danish Ball. My kids love to play the traditional Jenga. I thought it would be fun to make a giant sized version for the yard. The traditional Jenga pieces are 1.5 cm thick, 2.5 cm wide and 7.5 cm long, making the Giant Jenga pieces couldn't be … [Read more...]

A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.
Isn’t it amazing to have a wooden bangle in your hand? I am sure you would like this bangle and would love to wear it. This type of bangle is very rare and it is also very durable. It cannot be broken very easily. You can see the different designs of this bangle and can enjoy wearing it. I am sharing some of the pictures of these bangles; just have a look at these pictures and start your project. These pictures are for your help. So, have a look at these pictures for getting an idea on its making.
To be honest I'm not entirely sure of all the wood species because it was repurposed wood. The legs were from cedar 4x4 cutoffs and the aprons were from barn wood which I think was poplar. The top is from wood I helped salvage about 40 years ago as a kid and I'm not sure what type it is. It could be fir. I think the most important thing is to use wood that is dry and straight. Kiln dried is good. If I was going to Home Depot I'd buy pine for the legs and aprons and poplar for the top if planning to paint it. Poplar is much harder and therefore more durable than pine, however, a pine top would work too. Pine is cheaper than poplar. Douglas fir is also softer than poplar if you anticipate a lot of wear and tear. Pine and poplar are more difficult to stain evenly, but you could leave it natural and use a polyurethane to protect it.
Fancy miter gauges sure look nice, with all the coloured bits of anodized aluminium and brass knobs. But are those really something you need? Do you really think that an Incra brand miter gauge made out of bent sheet metal is more trustworthy than the more solid cast aluminium one that came with your saw? Sorry, but those are some of my pet peeves. Build yourself a good table saw sled instead, and you won't need to second guess it. If you cut a lot of 45-degree miters, make another sled with a 45 degree angle.
This box is the fifth generation of this design. After each production run of about 20 boxes, I make slight design changes to enhance the look and simplify the machining. Any hardwoods would work, but since the box uses so little lumber, I prefer to incorporate highly figured woods. For safety, ease of construction and consistent cuts, I use a jig for bevel-cutting the legs and another jig for beveling the top surface of the lid.
It was murderously hot here in the Charm City suburbs last weekend. The heat index topped a full 115 degrees on Saturday. But fear not, the heat didn’t deter us from tackling our long-awaited shed storage shelves project. We’re excited about this project because we’ve been looking forward to sharing a plywood shelving article for some time now, and this article gives us the perfect avenue for that. In case you’ve forgotten (or more likely if you’ve just started reading here), here’s the new shed. It looks great on the outside, but without some shelving and storage hooks for tools inside, most of the interior space would go to waste.
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