You’ll need to buy 4×4, 2×10, and 2×4 boards for this project. These boards can be found at your local lumber yard. Take your time to find quality boards that are straight and have little warp. First, I built the table top out of 2x10s. I used 5 2×10’s for the main part of the table and a 2×10 for each breadboard end. Ana’s plans call for four main boards, but I wanted a little larger area to spread out. I used a 12″ miter saw to make all of the cuts. I cut the 5 boards to 69 inches long.
*Please NOTE: While my table has held up well and had only a small amount of movement after 2 1/2 years, there are certainly things I would do differently with more experience under my belt. For beginners, I'd recommend using biscuits and glue for the top planks. Dowels or floating tenons/dominos are another option. Do make sure to let the wood properly dry.  

Drilling holes sounds pretty simple, and it is! There’s a few tricks though that will help you drill better holes and get more use from your drill. The video below includes tips like catching dust, making guides for drill holes, making sure you drill to the right depth every time, and creating pilot holes. Armed with these tips, your holes should be more consistent in depth, make less mess, and always be in the right place. 

Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.

This wood bench plan is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product. All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. My neighbor saw a cute wood bench at a local restaurant and wanted one for her house.  She snapped a few pics for me, … [Read more...]
Disclaimer: Although it is my intention to provide accurate plans and clear instructions, not all plans have been tried and tested. Using plans or information found on SawdustGirl.com indicates that you agree with the Terms of Use policy and will accept full responsibility for the process and outcome of any project you attempt. All plans are for private use only. Plans and information published on SawdustGirl.com may not be reproduced, republished or distributed in any manner without written permission from Sandra Powell, Sawdust Girl. Actual projects built using Sawdust Girl plans may be published on your own site without instructions or "tutorial" as long as you provide a link to my original post with full post title or "SawdustGirl.com" as link title.
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.
So, now that that is clear, determine the total length and width you want your table, the amount of overhang you want, and the thickness of your legs.  In this case, the table would be 96″ long and 42″ wide.  I wanted 1 1/2″ overhang on all sides (this will actually be 1 1/2″ off each LEG), and the legs are 5″ wide.  So, my two long aprons should be 96″-3″ (which is 2x the overhang)-10″ (which is 2x the leg width)=83″ long.  Cut two 2x6s this length.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.

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Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
If you have a small space in your kitchen or living space but require a table for dining or if you are fascinated with roundtable designs, you can consider this free DIY plan form Lane Home Co. to be a great option. Not only this table looks nice but also it is very sturdy with layered centered cross base in a V-shape. You might feel the table is difficult to make, but if you have the right tools and carefully follow the instructions, you will be able to accomplish the task easily.
If you`ve found the farmhouse table plans below interesting we invite you to check various other free woodworking plans, we have curated lists that will show you how to build a small cabin, greenhouse, porch swing, fire pit, garage, cat tower, a rocket stove, tiny house, duck house, deer stand, bat house, diy tree house, cat tower, porch swing, pole barn, rabbit hutch, diy dog bed, a playhouse, a chicken coop, a coffee table or a gazebo.
How beautiful!!!! Your dining room looks so warm and inviting, the table is gorgeous! And I LOVE how you all signed it, it’s sweet little things like that that make a house a home! Thanks so much for the tutorial, we’ve been thinking about building a dining table too, I ant wait to show my husband your awesome tutorial! Hope there are lots of fun times and delicious meals in your dining room’s future 🙂
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
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