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This part is optional, but I like the little detail it adds.  I used a table saw to cut a line down the trimmed down 2×6.  I cut it about 1″ from the bottom.  I adjusted my table saw blade about 1/4″ high and ran it through, then adjusted slightly and ran it through again so that the groove was cut about 2 blade widths thick (slightly under 1/4″).  You could do this with a router instead if you wanted.
Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.

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Because the legs I used are rather large and chunky, I wanted my apron to be larger than normal so it looked proportional.  Typically, a 2×4 is fine for an apron, but I used 2x6s and cut them down to 4 1/2″ wide using a table saw.  A standard 2×6 is 5 1/2″ wide.  You could leave it at 5 1/2″, just keep in mind the chair height and make sure you will have enough leg room to slide under.  If you wanted a less chunky leg, Timber Wolf has many other options on their website 🙂


Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8’s. Everything else was kept the same as Ana’s plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
A few years ago, I came up with a gift idea for a wooden tree ornament in the shape of a ukulele (consider it a small guitar, if it better suits your musical tastes). Instead of making each little uke individually (which would violate gift criteria #2), I make these decorative ornaments using what’s commonly referred to as the “log” method of construction. I create a single thick piece that’s shaped and appointed to resemble a uke, then slice it up into multiple thin ornaments. A single log made from scrap 8/4 stock yields eight to nine individual ornaments.
If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
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