A few years ago, I came up with a gift idea for a wooden tree ornament in the shape of a ukulele (consider it a small guitar, if it better suits your musical tastes). Instead of making each little uke individually (which would violate gift criteria #2), I make these decorative ornaments using what’s commonly referred to as the “log” method of construction. I create a single thick piece that’s shaped and appointed to resemble a uke, then slice it up into multiple thin ornaments. A single log made from scrap 8/4 stock yields eight to nine individual ornaments.
Since this 130 year old wood is painted on one surface I wanted to make sure it was sealed on all sides.  This old paint most likely contains lead.  It is always a good idea to seal both surfaces of a table top anyway to minimize warping from different rates of expansion and contraction.  Prior to sealing the top, it was sanded with 100, 150 and 220 grit sandpaper.  Two coats of Bullseye sealing shellac were applied to the top and bottom of the table top.  Two coats of Bullseye amber shellac and one coat of Bullseye clear shellac was applied to the table top after sealing.  Two coats of clear Briwax was rubbed into the top and buffed out for the final shine.

There are different grades of tools available at different prices. Salesmen will probably tell you to get good quality tools that last a lifetime. But the price difference between a cheap tool and a good quality tool can easily be a factor of four. My advice is to get cheap tools first and use them until they break. Once they break, it's time to consider getting something better. But unless you are a professional who uses the tools every day, even a cheap tool is likely to last a long time. 

Just look at this small and cute helicopter that is made of wood. I am sure you would enjoy having it. Your kids would play with this. If you are giving gifts to your friend on the birthday of his/her child, then it is the best gift. I am sure your friend would admire this gift and their kids would just love having it. There are different colors of this helicopter. I am sharing some of the pictures of this helicopter. Have a look at these pictures and get an idea about it.
If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
Often when working with wood, after cutting it up and drilling holes the surface will be unfinished with unsightly burs and splinters. This is a simple fix with a quick sanding, but with a seemingly endless amount of types and grits of sandpaper and sanding equipment this can get confusing. The main types of sanders we’ll cover are belt sanders, orbit sanders, and hand sanders.
If you want to get into woodworking, a good project to tackle is building your own workbench. It's really not that hard. So if building your own workbench is a bit too much work, or too intimidating, then take a step back and examine whether you really want to get into woodworking. This may be different if your goal is to cut silhouettes of kittens out of plywood with a scrollsaw, but I wouldn't call that sort of activity "woodworking".
8. Size a tenon on the cap piece to fit the ball’s hole. Undercut its shoulders, too. The cap piece, as shown here, is glued into a shallow hole turned into the face of a waste block. Shape the cap, then part it off the waste block. To clean up the tip, reverse the cap and push the tenon into a new hole in the waste block. Finish the cap on the lathe, then remove it and drill a small, shallow hole for the hanging wire.
To finish the table, I first sanded then added a little bit of distressing. Okay… A LOT of distressing. This step was probably the boys’ favorite, because I handed them each a large rock and let them go to town banging the heck out of the table. I wanted the table to look like it’s been around for generations, and all the little nicks and dings add SO much character to the wood.
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
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