If your space is very limited in your living or kitchen, you will love this farmhouse table design which can also be used as a kitchen island. This feature makes it perfect for keeping it in the kitchen space. If you have some woodworking skills, consider making pocket holes without adding 2×2 supports as in the original plan which saves both money and time. In this process, you will not have to drill or cut more holes, and all the screw holes can be hidden providing a better finish.
So I thought this would be the perfect project to try out my new sprayer on and, I’m telling you, friends…LIFE CHANGING.  I mean, I’ll be honest, there is a learning curve to spray painting.  There were some spots that I got a little too much paint and spots I didn’t quite get enough the first couple coats.  But, even with my amateur skills, this still saved me hours of time and looked WAY better than if I had brush painted.
Doing fine. I don't expect the pocket screws to fail or loosen over a typical period of time. They make a very solid joint especially if you also glue the joint. Compared to mortise and tenon a pocket screw will fail sooner under severe stress, however they are easier to repair than M&T which blow out. So I expect long use from this table unless a bunch of heavy people start dancing on it and the old wood will probably break first.
To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.
×