Living in South Florida gives me the ability to work under the bright Florida sun by simply rolling the woodworking power tools out from under the roof. On days like the one when this photo was taken, when rain is expected later in the afternoon, most of the tools can be kept under the roof, and rolled away into large lockable storage rooms in less than five minutes.
In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.

You can easily make these wooden hangings by taking equal size wooden pieces of different shapes. You must know you should have a bit of woodwork skills to do this creative and interesting work. All you need are a few pieces of wooden planks, a saw, screws and plates. I make this wooden hanging at home easily and decorate with different kind of paints especially seasonal flowers that give amazing look to the wall. You can also do easily. This DIY project is fun and good activity of the same time.
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
To make the top, align the three pieces of 2 x 12. Fit them as tightly together as you can. Bore four pocket-screw holes through the bottom faces of the top pieces, then spread glue on each adjoining edge. With the pieces clamped together so that the ends are flush, fasten with 2½-inch pocket screws. Glue will squeeze out of the joint. Wait a few minutes for the glue to get rubbery, then shave it off with a sharp chisel. Keep the top flat as it dries—I like to clamp cauls across both ends to add stability. Cauls are 2 x 4s or other pieces of stout wood turned on their edges.

10. Drip cyanoacrylate (CA) glue into the ball while holding the cap in place.This will firmly anchor the ball to the cap. To attach the hanging wire (see Sources, below), place a drop of glue on top of the hole and push in the wire. Apply glue to the icicle’s tenon and place it in the bottom hole. Slow setting CA glue works best for oily exotic woods such as rosewood and ebony.
This table is designed to be gorgeous. The table might look challenging to build, but if you follow the plan, it is very easy. If you check Step 1, you will find that cutting the joints can be done quickly and a 4 x 4 X-leg can be built with lap joint. This provides stability and durability. Moreover, the herringbone top makes the table even more beautiful.
To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.
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