TIP: If you like our table but want something that looks a little more polished, just expand the finishing step. Start by sanding carefully and thoroughly, then apply a pre-stain wood conditioner. This will highlight the wood's grain and prevent the stain from absorbing unevenly. Apply your chosen finish in thin coats, carefully sanding out each coat and removing the sanding dust with a tack cloth before applying the next one. Finish the table with a coat of wax. There, now it's shiny.
Fancy miter gauges sure look nice, with all the coloured bits of anodized aluminium and brass knobs. But are those really something you need? Do you really think that an Incra brand miter gauge made out of bent sheet metal is more trustworthy than the more solid cast aluminium one that came with your saw? Sorry, but those are some of my pet peeves. Build yourself a good table saw sled instead, and you won't need to second guess it. If you cut a lot of 45-degree miters, make another sled with a 45 degree angle.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?

There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.

In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
The cost of being disorganized is time. It takes me ten times as long to work on a project when I am scouring the room looking for a drill bit, the right screws, or trying to remember where I last used one of my 10 tape measures. Workshop organization is an ongoing project. As you acquire more tools, you have to rearrange your shop to work in storage for those new items. So mobile and modular storage, wherever possible will save you time down the road. Here are some amazing Workshop Organization Ideas that I hope will inspire you!

Another classic game! (Are you picking up on a trend?). A cribbage board is really just a piece of wood with 240-plus holes drilled in it. This project includes files necessary to program a CNC machine to drill all the holes, but it also includes a template for boring the holes with a drill. There are endless opportunities for customizing this project with different species of wood. All this adds up to the fact that cribbage boards make great gifts.


In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.

In my project section I wrote an article about small boxes made with a router. The article was written years ago and the boxes were made several years before that. Thus, I had to use one of those old boxes to write this article as I couldn't exactly remember how I made them. The initial construction process came from that great Canadian TV show, The Router Workshop, but the jig I use was born of necessity. One year I decided to build a pile of these boxes and enter a craft fair. After two or three, I decided there had to be a faster way to set up for the cuts, so I used a discarded table saw sled to fashion the jig in this article.
This saw has changed my life. I literally cannot even tell you who I am anymore. I have been reborn, and into a world where the lion lays with the sheep in euphoric happiness and cooperation. The skies are bluer now than ever before. My tastebuds have been supercharged; my skin feels tingly all through the day; my mind has been freed and I have new purpose and resolve. 

We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.
If you are looking to make a large table for dining or celebrating ceremonies with many guests, the J-pedestal dining table can be a great choice. The design was inspired by a Pottery Barn. This gorgeous table adds class to your space which your guests will also praise. Though the materials can be purchased at affordable prices (costing around $125), you need to have good carpentry skills to make it and also the process is time-consuming. Southern Yellow Pine is recommended to use for the top because not only it is inexpensive but also it is strong and durable.
The most useful stationary tools are a drill press and a table saw. For the longest time, I only had a cheap old contractor saw, and only a very small drill press, but I made do with those. The difference between a good drill press and a cheap drill press is much smaller than the difference between a cheap drill press and no drill press, so don't wait until you can afford the perfect one.
Often when working with wood, after cutting it up and drilling holes the surface will be unfinished with unsightly burs and splinters. This is a simple fix with a quick sanding, but with a seemingly endless amount of types and grits of sandpaper and sanding equipment this can get confusing. The main types of sanders we’ll cover are belt sanders, orbit sanders, and hand sanders. 

For the legs, we purchased black steel gas pipes which had to be measured and cut to size.  After the steel pipes were cut they had to be manually threaded with a pipe threader.  Gas fittings were used to connect the piping. This step resulted in a few choice bad words, it seems you can actually get them already threaded. But why should we take the easy route, when we can make ourselves crazy instead.


Actually, you're going to have the opposite problem because you'll meet people who DO cheap out on tools and find they don't work all that well, wear down quickly, and don't last that long. You will want the best of best but not be able to afford them all the time. You will find, more often than not, that some very good tools are available in the mid-priced ranges: not the least expensive but not the most, either. For example, these two sets of chisels are not terribly expensive but well made and a great quality for the price: Marples and the beginner's set I got from Woodcraft that's Made in the USA. You can ask for the nicer ones for Christmas when people ask for ideas. It's good to think of tools as things that you buy once, where possible, but there are some deals to be had.
A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.

Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
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If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
Because these legs were salvaged they had old screw holes in them which were filled prior to painting.  In retrospect, it probably would have looked cool to just leave them.  I lightly sanded the legs with 100 & 150 grit sandpaper which smoothed them without removing all the saw marks.  One coat of chalk paint and 2 coats of clear Briwax was used to finish the legs.  Briwax yellows the finish a bit which aged the paint nicely.  Between coats of Briwax I sanded through the paint on some of the edges with 100 grit paper to show wear.  

There are also project books that provide fun new ideas to play with on the scrollsaw, and the fun is made even better when you’re being productive by making gifts at the same time. If you’re a carver, there are many project ideas available to you, as well. There are also Christmas projects for the woodturner. One popular idea is to make ornaments for your tree—or someone else’s. There are several books that will provide help specifically for making ornaments. You’ll find that woodturning allows an opportunity for endless creativity! You can find a variety of kits available, and then you can use whatever material you prefer to turn and then shape and finish any ornament you can imagine!
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