Because these legs were salvaged they had old screw holes in them which were filled prior to painting.  In retrospect, it probably would have looked cool to just leave them.  I lightly sanded the legs with 100 & 150 grit sandpaper which smoothed them without removing all the saw marks.  One coat of chalk paint and 2 coats of clear Briwax was used to finish the legs.  Briwax yellows the finish a bit which aged the paint nicely.  Between coats of Briwax I sanded through the paint on some of the edges with 100 grit paper to show wear.  

Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.


In regards to your breadboard ends: You might be able to get away with what you did depending on how dramatic the humidity difference between seasons is in your area, but in the future, you might want to elongate your dowel holes in the tongue of the joint - all but the center hole. Specifically, you want to put a pin in the center of the table end (no hole elongation) and then elongate the holes on either side - maybe 1/16" to each side of center (it's OK to glue the center like you did). This allows the center pin to keep the board centered (duh) and then allows the table top to grow and shrink across it's width without putting undue stress on the breadboard ends. This is important because wood expands/contracts across it's grain significantly more than it does along it's length, so when you have a joint where end grain meets side grain (as in your breadboard ends) NOT taking this into account can mean that your project disassembles itself - or at least becomes "rickety" as the expansion/contraction cycle loosens the joint. The amount of growth you can expect is determined by wood species, initial moisture content of the wood, and humidity change across seasons. There are online references you can check to see how much you would want to elongate those holes.

Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
You're going to connect the two leg–apron assemblies to the stretchers using cross lap joints. These are among the easiest and most forgiving of wood joints to make, and they're also quite sturdy. Mark the joint positions on the legs and stretchers. Start the half-lap joints on the legs by notching the two outside lines with a circular saw set to a depth of 1½ inches. Guide the saw using a triangular rafter square. Between the two outside cuts make a series of relief cuts spaced ⅛ inch apart (fig. 3). Then use a sharp chisel to chop away the waste (fig. 4). When you cut the half-lap joints on the short stretcher, set the saw's depth to 1⅜ inches deep. This will make the stretcher extend ⅝ inch past the surface of the leg when the table is finally assembled. The offset will give you a table that looks like it was built by a farmer rather than by West Elm. It'll look nice.
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.

Hardware stores are full of big compound sliding miter saws. But before you buy one, ask yourself, how often do you need to cut miters on stock wider than a non sliding miter saw can handle? For the few times you have to do that, it's probably better to use a circular saw. The complicated mechanism of a compound sliding miter saw makes them bulky and less rigid. Which means an expensive compound miter saw may not make as clean a cut as you can with a table saw sled. 

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This Welcome Farmhouse Sign post is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product. All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. Farmhouse style wood signs are a fun way to personalize your space. They are fairly easy to make yourself … [Read more...]
As you can see in the image, this beautiful heart shaped wall hanging wooden piece on the wall. It looks beautiful and can be used to surprise someone special. The shape and design of this wooden hanging depend on how properly you build it. First time workers definitely need some guidance to help them with the process. You can choose the wood type, color and design as you like for your project. You can easily make it at home by using some artthings. You can decorate your wall hangings with different materials, designs and styles. I am actually making one of this wooden heart shaped hanging in my home. It is perfectly cool and artistic work. These hangings may be adjustable or a fixed.
While metal machinists’ straightedges are ideal for setting up woodworking machinery, their high-tolerance accuracy and weight are overkill for most woodworking tasks. For centuries, shop-made wooden straightedges handled many layout and testing chores, and the tools are still useful today. Wooden straightedges are lightweight, simple to make in any size and can be easily trued with common workshop tools. While straightedges that resemble the machinists’ versions – essentially a skinny rectangle with parallel edges – are useful, these tend to go out of square quickly as the seasons change. However, by understanding a bit about the way wood works, you can make a wooden straightedge that is both accurate and durable. 

Disclaimer: Almost any DIY project involves risk of some sort. Your tools, materials, and skills will vary, as will the conditions at your project site. Rogue Engineer has made every effort to be complete and accurate in the instructions provided on this website. Rogue Engineer will not assume any responsibility or liability for damages or losses sustained or incurred in the course of your project or in the use of the item you create. Always follow the manufacturer's operating instructions in the use of tools, check and follow your local building codes, and observe all commonly accepted safety precautions.
The most useful stationary tools are a drill press and a table saw. For the longest time, I only had a cheap old contractor saw, and only a very small drill press, but I made do with those. The difference between a good drill press and a cheap drill press is much smaller than the difference between a cheap drill press and no drill press, so don't wait until you can afford the perfect one.

The table top was then sealed with multiple coats of Varathane for protection.   We chose not to add a stain to the top because its natural coloring is gorgeous already.  There are shades of browns and grays in the wood along with saw marks from the original milling, knots, and grooves that you would come to expect from a reclaimed barn wood table.
With sharp hand tools and unforgiving power tools, woodworking can be a dangerous activity. By following some basic safety rules, though, you can considerably reduce the risk of injury. In order to be effective, safety rules must be implemented every time—no exceptions. Committing to making safety a habit increases your enjoyment and lowers the chance of injury (or worse) while woodworking.
Sometimes Grandparents can be hard to buy gifts for, they seem to have everything already. But hey you can't go wrong with darling gifts of grand kids, right!?! In this post I'm going to share a couple of ideas for personalized photo gifts. To make the photo gifts, I will be using Photoshop Elements 2018. I have been using Photoshop Elements ever since I graduated from trying … [Read more...]
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