We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.


You're going to connect the two leg–apron assemblies to the stretchers using cross lap joints. These are among the easiest and most forgiving of wood joints to make, and they're also quite sturdy. Mark the joint positions on the legs and stretchers. Start the half-lap joints on the legs by notching the two outside lines with a circular saw set to a depth of 1½ inches. Guide the saw using a triangular rafter square. Between the two outside cuts make a series of relief cuts spaced ⅛ inch apart (fig. 3). Then use a sharp chisel to chop away the waste (fig. 4). When you cut the half-lap joints on the short stretcher, set the saw's depth to 1⅜ inches deep. This will make the stretcher extend ⅝ inch past the surface of the leg when the table is finally assembled. The offset will give you a table that looks like it was built by a farmer rather than by West Elm. It'll look nice.
Making a garden arched footbridge out of some wood boards can be fun, hard working plan and also it’s quite rewarding. We are providing the project tutorial for how to build an arched footbridge without rails or having rails. If you take your hands of work and have some basic woodworking skills you can easily build this type of bridge. While this garden bridge is too small to walk over but it can make a really stunning addition to your lush yard or garden. 

This wood bench plan is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product. All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. My neighbor saw a cute wood bench at a local restaurant and wanted one for her house.  She snapped a few pics for me, … [Read more...]

Nothing could be easier to accomplish than these rustic, personalized wood slice tree ornaments. After slicing a log into discs, screw in an eye hook, and thread with some jute twine for a hanger. Decorate with paint or metallic markers, or try the clever ink-jet-printer transfer technique that Upcycled Treasures used for the ornaments shown here. One log will make gifts for your entire extended family.
One of the most elegant farmhouse tables that can add to your space is this simple design. If you have a large dining space, you can make this rustic design. At least ten people can sit together at this dining table. The dimensions of this table are 96″X41″. The bench and the chairs add character to this farmhouse table. Simply, follow the instructions step by step and shop for the materials required to make this beautiful piece. Kiln-dried pine wood is recommended for this table.
Build your own platform bed frame at your home by following the source linked tutorial given above. The source link also includes more pictures that can help you to build a better bed frame. You can see a step by step set of instructions and guidelines to follow with real life pictures, as well as you can download a PDF file detailing the list of materials and tools you’ll need, know about the length of every board, and most importantly color-coded illustrations of the building process.
I think you can see from all of these choices, the best solution is the one that works for YOU and your home. Just make sure you create an environment that makes you feel creative and excited to work. And while there are amazing workshops online for inspiration, don’t go crazy thinking your work area needs to be a renovation in and of itself! Use bits and pieces of inspiration, then get going on your projects!
Bandsaws are very handy. They cut cleaner than jigsaws, but perhaps one of the biggest advantages of a bandsaw is convenience. It's my tool of choice for making most quick rough cuts. I also use it for cutting up long scraps to short pieces to fit them in the scrap box. I actually bought my bandsaw before I bought a table saw - I saw one marked down at a woodworking show, and I knew I'd get one eventually, so I jumped on it. That was before I built a bandsaw
Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8's. Everything else was kept the same as Ana's plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.

After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:


In regards to flattening the top, another technique would be take a pencil (soft lead) and lightly draw some big lazy squiggles across the top - enough so that there is a line every few inches. Then, use either a jointer plane or a belt sander to flatten the top until the squiggles are gone. The lines give you a reference to what is high and what is low - and when you are finished in a particular area. With the jointer plane, you want to stroke at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood, and with a belt sander, you want to keep the sander flat on it's platen (don't let it tilt and dig in) and use wide, arcing, sideways sweeps with very light pressure - again at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood - never let the sander start or stop when in contact with the surface. In both cases, finish with light sanding with either a belt sander, linear sander, or by hand, stroking in the direction of the grain. Palm sanders can leave swirls.

I keep looking for a printable version of both your table and benches. I can’t seem to find them. I am hoping that you can email them to me – I want my brother-in-law to help me make the table and benches. If you don’t have the plans do you recommend I just copy and paste your information off into word or something. Thanks so much for your help – this is exactly what I have been looking for!


If you don’t have a large space for dining, you can check this plan. This design from Instructables is very basic to make and can easily fit in your small space. However, it has the capacity for six people to sit together at the table. The cost depends on the type of lumber you are using; construction grade pine wood might cost around $50, and if you are using furniture grade lumber, it might cost approximately $120.
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East Coast Creative provides this DIY plan to make your farmhouse table which can be used for a picnic with many guests. This gigantic table can fit 12-14 people. Though it does not have benches, the top of the table spreads out like a traditional picnic table. You can add chairs of your choice and so, if you want to add a modern twist, simply choose chairs with modern styles.
​The plan tutorial includes images, diagrams, step-by-step instructions, and even a video to help you along the way. You can also go with some more bookcase design ideas. Browse the internet for more and we are also proving a link below to some more ideas to this plan. Select and build one of these free bookcase DIYs and you will have everything available easily that you need to get started creating a bookshelf for any room in your house.
I recently came across this beautiful wooden hanging swing, which was made in the square shape. The very first look was enough for me to start loving it. Although I haven’t yet tried building one myself, I am definitely going to. You can also make one for elders and put it in your garden or terrace or anywhere in the house. Elders can use it to relax and the kids can use it to play or sleep. Although this is a really beautiful piece of woodwork, it is not that easy to make. Only someone with good woodworking skill can think of making this swing set.

Farm tables are those warm, rustic surfaces that draw inspiration from the original harvest tables found in American homes of the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than being built by skilled and trained artisans, farm tables were assembled from large and rough planks of fir. Their construction valued sturdiness and utility over detail and refinery. Today, farm tables can bring a sense of antique charm to any home, complementing matched chairs and contemporary benches alike. Here are five DIY farmhouse table projects to inspire your next act of handyman prowess.
I love this barnwood reclaimed table-your husband did a beautiful job! We have a coffee table and two end tables (hand-me-downs) that remind me a little of this table. They each have metal legs that have criss-cross metal bars that make shelves below, and are great for holding baskets. The tops of each were pretty rough when we inherited the tables, and lately I’ve been thinking about either sanding and then white-washing the wood, and now after seeing your pictures I’m thinking more about just sanding the tops and see how they look and maybe finishing them like you did your table!? (I think I like your idea better! How many coats of Varathane did you folks use?) Thank you so much for sharing!
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
One of the most elegant farmhouse tables that can add to your space is this simple design. If you have a large dining space, you can make this rustic design. At least ten people can sit together at this dining table. The dimensions of this table are 96″X41″. The bench and the chairs add character to this farmhouse table. Simply, follow the instructions step by step and shop for the materials required to make this beautiful piece. Kiln-dried pine wood is recommended for this table.
This is another basic farmhouse table design which you can easily build. However, the table is large with a seating capacity of at least ten people. This table is also a great addition to be in your home as it serves many purposes including storage apart from dining. The instructions are provided in two separate parts; first part includes the construction process and the second part includes the finishing touches.
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.
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