The router might just be the most versatile woodworking power tool there is and it's a great first tool for beginner woodworkers. When set up properly and safely handled, a router can do everything from cutting joinery to shaping parts. Just be sure you understand the basic safety procedures and read the tool's manual if you're new to using a router.
This woodshop photo is the outdoor Florida woodshop of Woodworking Guide Chris Baylor. This woodshop photo shows a portable miter saw stand, temporary shop table consisting of a pair of sawhorses with plywood as a table top, a contractor table saw and band saw on portable bases, and an Adirondack loveseat glider rocker that is a current woodworking project in progress.

Hey, I want to build all of these (and I did read to the end), but my list of projects is so long that any one of these will have to wait ’til next year (and i don’t mean January). thanks for all these ideas. there is one more i read about in the Handy Family Man. It is an adaptation to your shop vac that puts the hose at your project so it sucks up the dust as it is produced. Wonderful, right? Maybe next year!
Finally, a word on glues: You might want to do some experimenting with polyurethane glue instead of aliphatic resin (wood) glue. Polyurethane glues require a slightly different work flow, but since switching to polyurethane about 15 years ago, I can't see going back. I use aliphatic glues for some things (like biscuit joints) - but not very often. Polyurethane glues actually harden (aliphatic resins remain "liquid"), poly takes stain like wood (no bright areas where the stain wouldn't bond to the glue lines), poly doesn't dull tools or gum up sandpaper, poly is waterproof and can fill minor gaps. My favorite brand, so far, is Gorilla Glue.
These attractive gifts look like mini treasure chests. Here are the free woodworking plans, and assembly instructions to make these nice looking wooden boxes (Children's Mini Desktop Treasure Chest) from scratch. Recycle that scrap wood into a fantastic gift. A rewarding Saturday Arts and Crafts project. Free DIY (do-it-yourself, D.I.Y.) to give as a gift. Make a keepsake by using these woodworking plans.
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
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