Our tables are available in any base design including a variety of leg, single pedestal, double pedestal and trestle designs.  When considering what type of table base you want, it is important to consider both look and functionality.  Leg style bases (tapered, square, turned or curved) provide the traditional farmhouse table look and are the most economical option.  Single pedestals work well with round and square tables.  Double pedestal and trestle tables are great for longer tables and tight seating requirements.


For the legs, we purchased black steel gas pipes which had to be measured and cut to size.  After the steel pipes were cut they had to be manually threaded with a pipe threader.  Gas fittings were used to connect the piping. This step resulted in a few choice bad words, it seems you can actually get them already threaded. But why should we take the easy route, when we can make ourselves crazy instead.
Some friends of ours have been wanting a DIY farmhouse table for some time now. After hearing about their shopping trip and the prices they were looking at spending on one I felt obligated to step in and make this one of my next DIY projects. My buddy Jake has no experience with power tools whatsoever, bless his heart. So, you’re in for a special treat with this one as you will get to see Jake build this table from scratch with no power tool experience! With a little guidance from me of course.
These attractive gifts look like mini treasure chests. Here are the free woodworking plans, and assembly instructions to make these nice looking wooden boxes (Children's Mini Desktop Treasure Chest) from scratch. Recycle that scrap wood into a fantastic gift. A rewarding Saturday Arts and Crafts project. Free DIY (do-it-yourself, D.I.Y.) to give as a gift. Make a keepsake by using these woodworking plans.
Fancy miter gauges sure look nice, with all the coloured bits of anodized aluminium and brass knobs. But are those really something you need? Do you really think that an Incra brand miter gauge made out of bent sheet metal is more trustworthy than the more solid cast aluminium one that came with your saw? Sorry, but those are some of my pet peeves. Build yourself a good table saw sled instead, and you won't need to second guess it. If you cut a lot of 45-degree miters, make another sled with a 45 degree angle.
Some friends of ours have been wanting a DIY farmhouse table for some time now. After hearing about their shopping trip and the prices they were looking at spending on one I felt obligated to step in and make this one of my next DIY projects. My buddy Jake has no experience with power tools whatsoever, bless his heart. So, you’re in for a special treat with this one as you will get to see Jake build this table from scratch with no power tool experience! With a little guidance from me of course.
Do you want to use an oil stain, a gel stain, a water-based stain or a lacquer stain? What about color? Our ebook tells you what you really need to know about the chemistry behind each wood stain, and what to expect when you brush, wipe or spray it on. It’s a lot simpler than you think! This is the comprehensive guide to all the varieties of stain you will find at the store and how to use them.
A 1914 book which treats, in a most practical and fascinating manner all subjects pertaining to the "King of Trades"; showing the care and use of tools; drawing; designing; and the laying out of work. The principles involved in the building of various kinds of structures, and the rudiments of architecture. It contains over two hundred and fifty illustrations made especially for this work, and includes also a complete glossary of the technical terms used in the art. The most comprehensive volume on this subject ever published for boys.
I think this is one of the best feelings if you are successful in making wooden spoon by yourself without any trouble. You can create stylish and unique spoon at home. The only thing is that you just need to follow some steps for making a perfect spoon. In this video, you can see how simply the making of a spoon is and how much you need time for making is explained in this video.
If you`ve found the farmhouse table plans below interesting we invite you to check various other free woodworking plans, we have curated lists that will show you how to build a small cabin, greenhouse, porch swing, fire pit, garage, cat tower, a rocket stove, tiny house, duck house, deer stand, bat house, diy tree house, cat tower, porch swing, pole barn, rabbit hutch, diy dog bed, a playhouse, a chicken coop, a coffee table or a gazebo. 

Having swing in your own home, yard or garden can be so de-stressing and be relaxing a thing to enjoy, that doesn’t matter you have a big yard or patio, or vacant porch. Kids will surely fall in love with this swing porch and love playing on a breezy day. Even, adults also do relax and enjoy a quite morning coffee, or just being embraced by the sun in the swing.

This activity shows the making of square shape wooden cutting board with one of the easiest ways by using basic tools. I made it at home for my inspiration behind easy steps. This tutorial is easy enough for even beginners to understand and follow. So I am not going to explain each and every step. You can also make by painting the wood pieces, cutting, assembling, and joining in a square order to make it and put it in every corner of your kitchen to give classy look.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
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As Chief Creative Officer and Founding Partner at Brit + Co, Anjelika Temple brings her voracious consumption of all things creative and colorful to DIY projects, geeky gadgetry finds and more. When she's not DIY-ing her heart out, you'll find her throwing dinner parties with friends or adventuring with her husband David, their daughter Anokhi, and their silly dog Turkey.
No doubt many of us would love to have a huge, 2000 square foot building devoted to woodcraft, on a wooded acreage somewhere. But there is a reality that goes with a hobby shared by numerous ordinary people: very few really have the means to set up such palatial workshops. We have our lives to lead, and engaging in such a venture is out of the reach for most, myself included. This article is dedicated to workshops for "the rest of us."
Having swing in your own home, yard or garden can be so de-stressing and be relaxing a thing to enjoy, that doesn’t matter you have a big yard or patio, or vacant porch. Kids will surely fall in love with this swing porch and love playing on a breezy day. Even, adults also do relax and enjoy a quite morning coffee, or just being embraced by the sun in the swing.
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check. 

This rustic farmhouse table comes with an extension leaf making it extremely functional. When required, you can extend the two end pieces to add extension leaves for additional space on the table and when not in use, simply slide it in. It will cost you around $230-$300 based on the materials which you already have. Though it requires some carpentry skills to get the job done, you can also do it with attention to the detailed instructions provided if you are new to woodworking.
With a little woodworking knowledge and use of some basic items, you can build a wonderful tissue box holder of your own. You can easily build them in bulk and then sell at good rates. Although easy, a wooden tissue box is an equally important and useful item for households. You can also make wonderful variety of wooden boxes easily at home. It is actually very easy and interesting to make. These wooden items give a classy look to your interior furnishing. This is the easiest way to spice up your tables with beautiful wooden tissue boxes. By doing this you can give style to your table settings.

Pegboard is the master of all workshop organizational tools. You can buy full sheets (4x8) at any big box store, but most also sell smaller, more manageable sheets. And while you can just slap these up on any wall, something like this fold-out wall cabinet will double your storage and keep your tools tucked safely away. You could also try this fancy sliding-door version.


Whether your work area is a dedicated shop or a temporary cleared space in the basement or garage safety has to be the number one concern. A clean shop is a safe shop, spend a few minutes at the end of the day picking up and sweeping the floor. This not only cleans your surroundings, it also clears your mind, the solution to that problem you had earlier may suddenly appear.
Using shelving in your room or kitchen is a great way to arrange and de-clutter space… I know, such ground-breaking term it is. Do not write me off yet, I just want to show you how you can build some clean floating corner shelving that appears to have no brackets. You can create them at no cost, and the hardest part of the plan is figuring out what you are going to put on these shelves when you are finished.

Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8's. Everything else was kept the same as Ana's plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.

Jigsaws have a reciprocating blade, and are a great do-it-all saw which we use them quite often on our projects. They excel at making oddly shaped cuts and curves, but aren’t so great if you need perfectly straight cuts. Another advantage to jigsaws is that the blades are small, cheap, and interchangeable so that you can quickly swap between cutting different materials.
I love this barnwood reclaimed table-your husband did a beautiful job! We have a coffee table and two end tables (hand-me-downs) that remind me a little of this table. They each have metal legs that have criss-cross metal bars that make shelves below, and are great for holding baskets. The tops of each were pretty rough when we inherited the tables, and lately I’ve been thinking about either sanding and then white-washing the wood, and now after seeing your pictures I’m thinking more about just sanding the tops and see how they look and maybe finishing them like you did your table!? (I think I like your idea better! How many coats of Varathane did you folks use?) Thank you so much for sharing!
Getting started in woodworking can seem like a daunting task. From specialty woodworking tools to identifying and understanding the different types of wood, there is so much to know that even the old-timers are still developing. But learning and experimenting are what woodworking is all about. Get started on the right foot with some essential basics about safety, tools, lumber, and traditional layout and measuring techniques.

You have no money, so you have dull IKEA knives in your kitchen right now that you don't even realize are dull, but you're going to learn that dull knives and tools can be more dangerous than sharp ones. You start changing your form to try to make them work better, when they really just need sharpening. Sign up for that sharpening class you're thinking of taking, stop being afraid to take tools apart to sharpen them thinking you won't be able to put them back together (especially the Lie Nielsen ones, but maybe just don't start with those), and do it. Learning how to properly remove rust and sharpen tools will be one of the skills you'll be most thankful for as time goes on, and it will also enable you to buy some inexpensive used tools at garage sales and make them sing. Speaking of sharpening...
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.
There's no better way to give thanks than to gather family and friends around an enormous table to share a feast. A farmhouse table would be the perfect spot. You could make one out of construction lumber and ordinary hardware in a couple of days. We're not talking precision woodworking here. If you can handle a circular saw and a chisel, you can do this. Farmers used to build these tables themselves, not furniture makers or carpenters, so it's okay if it turns out a bit rustic. That's half the fun. The other half is sitting down to eat at a table you built yourself.

Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:
Below you will find some of the free woodworking plans to be found on the net. Much of the information was gathered from the newsgroup rec.woodworking (also available via google groups). This list is far from complete. I'd suggest you learn to use a search engine like Altavista or Google. Just type in the project name you want to do, and "plans". This will help you find all sorts of things.

The free woodworking plans are sometimes very straightforward and easy, and sometimes only for someone with a high level of woodworking artistry. When you find something you'd like to build, print out the free project and instructions while they are still available. Make a point of checking the material lists before buying your building materials for accuracy.
Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.

A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
10. Drip cyanoacrylate (CA) glue into the ball while holding the cap in place.This will firmly anchor the ball to the cap. To attach the hanging wire (see Sources, below), place a drop of glue on top of the hole and push in the wire. Apply glue to the icicle’s tenon and place it in the bottom hole. Slow setting CA glue works best for oily exotic woods such as rosewood and ebony.
Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.

In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.
Slice, dice and serve in style on this easy, attractive board. We’ll show you a simple way to dry-fit the parts, scribe the arc and then glue the whole thing together. We used a 4-ft. steel ruler to scribe the arcs, but a yardstick or any thin board would also work. Find complete how-to instructions on this woodworking crafts project here. Also, be sure to use water-resistant wood glue and keep your board out of the dishwasher or it might fall apart. And one more thing: Keep the boards as even as possible during glue-up to minimize sanding later. For great tips on gluing wood, check out this collection.
If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
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