Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
Build your own furniture, a dream of many but a reality for few. In this video I show you how I make farm tables. This is one made for a customer for a new house. It's 10 feet long and made from red oak, sawn from a dead standing tree. The base is made from spruce and yellow pine. It is constructed with mortise and tenon joints, using a hollow chisel mortiser and a tenon jig I made for the table saw.
*Please NOTE: While my table has held up well and had only a small amount of movement after 2 1/2 years, there are certainly things I would do differently with more experience under my belt. For beginners, I'd recommend using biscuits and glue for the top planks. Dowels or floating tenons/dominos are another option. Do make sure to let the wood properly dry.
While metal machinists’ straightedges are ideal for setting up woodworking machinery, their high-tolerance accuracy and weight are overkill for most woodworking tasks. For centuries, shop-made wooden straightedges handled many layout and testing chores, and the tools are still useful today. Wooden straightedges are lightweight, simple to make in any size and can be easily trued with common workshop tools. While straightedges that resemble the machinists’ versions – essentially a skinny rectangle with parallel edges – are useful, these tend to go out of square quickly as the seasons change. However, by understanding a bit about the way wood works, you can make a wooden straightedge that is both accurate and durable.
Disclaimer: Although it is my intention to provide accurate plans and clear instructions, not all plans have been tried and tested. Using plans or information found on SawdustGirl.com indicates that you agree with the Terms of Use policy and will accept full responsibility for the process and outcome of any project you attempt. All plans are for private use only. Plans and information published on SawdustGirl.com may not be reproduced, republished or distributed in any manner without written permission from Sandra Powell, Sawdust Girl. Actual projects built using Sawdust Girl plans may be published on your own site without instructions or "tutorial" as long as you provide a link to my original post with full post title or "SawdustGirl.com" as link title.
Right now, Beginning Woodworker Self, your definition of "scrap" is a shim or a 1" piece of end grain. But "scrap" means something else to lumber yard owners and purveyors of fine hard woods, like 2' lengths of thick mahogany and 8"x6" chunks of black walnut. One day, your friend Peter, who already knows how to ask for scrap, will go to a local lumber company and ask if he can buy some. The owner will tell your friend that he can take as much scrap as he can carry in his car for $100. Peter drives a VW bus, and will have the rafters of his garage filled with multi-foot lengths of cherry, mahogany, black walnut, maple, and poplar for many years to come. Ask for scrap.
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This practical entryway storage unit is made from solid wood and is glued together: no nails or screws (apart from those that hold it to the wall) are used. In this case, we made it out of soft maple, but it could be made from any good quality solid wood: pine, oak, birch, fir…whatever best matches the trim or furnishings in the place where it will be mounted to the wall.

By video tutorial, you will get step by step process instructions of making a nice wooden folding sling chair from scratch. However, my first wooden chair was not the best one, but it was good enough to motivate me to make some more folding chairs like this one. If I can make this, you too can make one yourself. You can browse the internet for more folding sling chairs ideas and start making one now.


Each issue of Wood News , our online woodworking magazine, features a different home workshop, and we've compiled 10 of these features here. Browsing them is a great way to find new ideas on how to set up your own shop, or if you just want to see innovative ways other woodworkers have approached the various shop setup issues we all face. From space considerations and smart storage ideas to the various tool combinations and approaches to woodworking, you'll find something here that's really interesting. Click each image to take a look!


Build this handy stool in one hour and park it in your closet. You can also use it as a step to reach the high shelf. All you need is a 4 x 4-ft. sheet of 3/4-in. plywood, wood glue and a handful of 8d finish nails. Cut the plywood pieces according to the illustration. Spread wood glue on the joints, then nail them together with 8d finish nails. First nail through the sides into the back. Then nail through the top into the sides and back. Finally, mark the location of the two shelves and nail through the sides into the shelves. Don’t have floor space to spare? Build these super simple wall-mounted shoe organizers instead!
While you can purchase pre-surfaced lumber at your local home center, there are several benefits to buying rough-sawn lumber from a hardwood dealer and milling it to size in your shop. Rough-sawn lumber is typically less expensive than pre-surfaced lumber. And rough-sawn lumber can be milled to custom thickness giving you more flexibility with your woodworking designs. Check out this video for a detailed explanation on how lumber is cut and sold, including how to speak like a pro at the lumberyard and how to calculate a board foot.
A few years ago, I came up with a gift idea for a wooden tree ornament in the shape of a ukulele (consider it a small guitar, if it better suits your musical tastes). Instead of making each little uke individually (which would violate gift criteria #2), I make these decorative ornaments using what’s commonly referred to as the “log” method of construction. I create a single thick piece that’s shaped and appointed to resemble a uke, then slice it up into multiple thin ornaments. A single log made from scrap 8/4 stock yields eight to nine individual ornaments.
In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.

At Cottage Home, we know purchasing custom furniture and décor on the Internet can raise some concerns and questions. Our business is dedicated to pioneering a new process for providing high-quality made-to-order furniture on the Internet. We strive to make it as easy as possible for our customers to have access to custom bench-built products for their homes.


Wood screws often have a coarse pitch, unthreaded shank (the bit between the head and the tip), and flat heads. The coarse pitch helps the wood screw tap into the wood and make a solid connection. The unthreaded shank is used so that the head can go flush with the wood beneath it without the threads getting in the way. Flat heads are typically used so that the screw can sit flush against the wood. Most wood screws also require a pilot hole, which you should drill with a drill bit prior to screwing the screw into the wood, find a chart on what size hole to drill for what screw here. 

Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
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