Super Chunky X Table Plans and Tool Review is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product. All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. During this build, I'll be reviewing the Ridgid MegaMax, Diablo blades, Bosch drill bits and Makita … [Read more...]
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So, now that that is clear, determine the total length and width you want your table, the amount of overhang you want, and the thickness of your legs.  In this case, the table would be 96″ long and 42″ wide.  I wanted 1 1/2″ overhang on all sides (this will actually be 1 1/2″ off each LEG), and the legs are 5″ wide.  So, my two long aprons should be 96″-3″ (which is 2x the overhang)-10″ (which is 2x the leg width)=83″ long.  Cut two 2x6s this length.
For the legs, we purchased black steel gas pipes which had to be measured and cut to size.  After the steel pipes were cut they had to be manually threaded with a pipe threader.  Gas fittings were used to connect the piping. This step resulted in a few choice bad words, it seems you can actually get them already threaded. But why should we take the easy route, when we can make ourselves crazy instead.
This table is designed to be gorgeous. The table might look challenging to build, but if you follow the plan, it is very easy. If you check Step 1, you will find that cutting the joints can be done quickly and a 4 x 4 X-leg can be built with lap joint. This provides stability and durability. Moreover, the herringbone top makes the table even more beautiful.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
The blade on a block plane, (click to enlarge drawing) commonly referred to as a plane iron, is mounted with the bevel side up to produce a cutting angle of about 37 degrees in a standard plane and 25 degrees in a low-angle plane. Some block planes feature an adjustable mouth, which allows the plane to be tuned for different cuts; Close the mouth and lower the blade for finish cuts or open the mouth and extend the blade for thicker rough cuts.
I can't really make good recommendations as to what specific brands of tools are better than others. Most of my tools were opportunistic purchases, with relatively little regard to specific brands. More often than not, it's price and a quick inspection to gauge the solidity of the tool that are the determining factors. My tools are usually not among the best that can be had, but good enough.
This rustic farmhouse table comes with an extension leaf making it extremely functional. When required, you can extend the two end pieces to add extension leaves for additional space on the table and when not in use, simply slide it in. It will cost you around $230-$300 based on the materials which you already have. Though it requires some carpentry skills to get the job done, you can also do it with attention to the detailed instructions provided if you are new to woodworking.
This wooden sofa side table can also be made in different sizes and shapes as you can find on the internet. Some of the items you will need for this project are wooden pieces, cutter, screws, etc. We have included a video tutorial here that illustrates the process of building a wooden sofa side table. This is not the exact one that you see in the image above, but it can be modified to build any shape or design you want. The video tutorial also has English subtitles to make it easy for anyone to understand and follow the steps.
I am working on a range of traditional handmade oak furniture in kit form. At the moment I am limiting it to a ‘Joined’ or ‘Coffin’ stool together with a table version. I have created a website http://www.oakits.co.uk with a link to an instruction video on YouTube. There has been a lot of interest here in the U.K. but I’m wondering if there may be a market for them in the U.S. Your comments would be greatly appreciated
Wood screws often have a coarse pitch, unthreaded shank (the bit between the head and the tip), and flat heads. The coarse pitch helps the wood screw tap into the wood and make a solid connection. The unthreaded shank is used so that the head can go flush with the wood beneath it without the threads getting in the way. Flat heads are typically used so that the screw can sit flush against the wood. Most wood screws also require a pilot hole, which you should drill with a drill bit prior to screwing the screw into the wood, find a chart on what size hole to drill for what screw here. 

Cordless tools are very handy, and I love my cordless drills. However, if you are just dabbling with getting into woodworking, and you may only use your tools every six months, you may find the litium batteries dying prematurely. Litium batteries slowly self-discharge, and once fully discharged, they are permanently damaged. So if, for example, you use a cordless drill until the battery is low, put it away without recharging, and try to charge it again months later, you may find the battery no longer able to take a charge.
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