I have been involved one way or another with woodworking for the last six decades, it began when I was about ten years old, my father built me a jigsaw by modifying an old Briggs and Stratton engine. Looking back I don't believe it cost him anything more than the price of a few welding rods to give me hours of entertainment cutting doodads out of apple box wood. The last three have been limited due to health reasons but I still do small projects when necessary.
I think this is one of the best feelings if you are successful in making wooden spoon by yourself without any trouble. You can create stylish and unique spoon at home. The only thing is that you just need to follow some steps for making a perfect spoon. In this video, you can see how simply the making of a spoon is and how much you need time for making is explained in this video.
In regards to flattening the top, another technique would be take a pencil (soft lead) and lightly draw some big lazy squiggles across the top - enough so that there is a line every few inches. Then, use either a jointer plane or a belt sander to flatten the top until the squiggles are gone. The lines give you a reference to what is high and what is low - and when you are finished in a particular area. With the jointer plane, you want to stroke at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood, and with a belt sander, you want to keep the sander flat on it's platen (don't let it tilt and dig in) and use wide, arcing, sideways sweeps with very light pressure - again at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood - never let the sander start or stop when in contact with the surface. In both cases, finish with light sanding with either a belt sander, linear sander, or by hand, stroking in the direction of the grain. Palm sanders can leave swirls.
Choose a light-colored wood with interesting grain for the ball. It should be one solid piece, 2 1⁄2- to 3-in. square. I like to make more than one ornament at a time, so I use a rough blank about 8-in. long in order to make two balls. Make the cap and icicle from a contrasting dark wood that takes fine details. I like to use rosewood or ebony. You’ll need a piece that’s 1-in. square and 8-in. long.
Pegboard is the master of all workshop organizational tools. You can buy full sheets (4x8) at any big box store, but most also sell smaller, more manageable sheets. And while you can just slap these up on any wall, something like this fold-out wall cabinet will double your storage and keep your tools tucked safely away. You could also try this fancy sliding-door version.
Hand saws are a good option for making quick cuts that don’t need to be perfectly straight. They do take some muscle as they are non-powered, but are perfect for a quick job. The downside to hand-saws is you will need a different saw for each type of material you need to cut, so if you’re trying to cut wood and sheet metal, that’s an additional cost.

Disclaimer: Almost any DIY project involves risk of some sort. Your tools, materials, and skills will vary, as will the conditions at your project site. Rogue Engineer has made every effort to be complete and accurate in the instructions provided on this website. Rogue Engineer will not assume any responsibility or liability for damages or losses sustained or incurred in the course of your project or in the use of the item you create. Always follow the manufacturer's operating instructions in the use of tools, check and follow your local building codes, and observe all commonly accepted safety precautions.


Nightstand table plans have everything you need to create a bedside table to keep every needy thing at reach at night time. This Nigh Stand plan is quite different in design from the most of the other plans. This stand has not only the three regular drawers but also having a hidden drawer that uses a secret locking mechanism to keep contents securely.

A wooden cutting board can be used in the kitchen for cutting purposes. You can see one in the image above. This wooden cutting board can be built by using wooden pallets from your house. You need only a few items to build this beautiful wooden cutting board. I suggest you to make more than one as they can be used anywhere in the house for many purposes. You can easily make it at home and use it for cutting different things in the kitchen. In addition, it adds a nice visual appeal to your kitchen. Make sure to use only high quality items for any woodworking project.
Bandsaws are very handy. They cut cleaner than jigsaws, but perhaps one of the biggest advantages of a bandsaw is convenience. It's my tool of choice for making most quick rough cuts. I also use it for cutting up long scraps to short pieces to fit them in the scrap box. I actually bought my bandsaw before I bought a table saw - I saw one marked down at a woodworking show, and I knew I'd get one eventually, so I jumped on it. That was before I built a bandsaw

Drilling holes sounds pretty simple, and it is! There’s a few tricks though that will help you drill better holes and get more use from your drill. The video below includes tips like catching dust, making guides for drill holes, making sure you drill to the right depth every time, and creating pilot holes. Armed with these tips, your holes should be more consistent in depth, make less mess, and always be in the right place.
It was murderously hot here in the Charm City suburbs last weekend. The heat index topped a full 115 degrees on Saturday. But fear not, the heat didn’t deter us from tackling our long-awaited shed storage shelves project. We’re excited about this project because we’ve been looking forward to sharing a plywood shelving article for some time now, and this article gives us the perfect avenue for that. In case you’ve forgotten (or more likely if you’ve just started reading here), here’s the new shed. It looks great on the outside, but without some shelving and storage hooks for tools inside, most of the interior space would go to waste.
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