Basically, as you beginner you will need the following tools: a drill, an impact driver, a miter saw and a sander. With these tools you can cut, join and finish wood as a professional. If you want to save time and improve the quality of your work you can upgrade and buy yourself a pocket hole jig, a router, a thickness planer and a table saw. I have created a complete guide with tool recommendations and reviews HERE, so you make an informed decision.
A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.

The bill of materials below assumes all the lumber is good. You should buy extra lumber to be able to leave out pieces with defects in them. In general, its best to buy wider pieces of lumber and rip them into narrower pieces, such as buying 2x6 and ripping the 2x3's out of them. You get much better lumber that way. It may be better to buy five 2x10x8' instead of the parts marked with an asterisk, and cut everything from those.


Modifications: The only modifications I made to Ana's plans were to the overall size. I used an additional 2×10 to increase the width of the table. I cut the table top boards a little longer and enlarged the width of the table base. I show the table top modifications in drawings below. Feel free to modify your table from the plans to best suit your needs.

When you are gathering inspiration for barn door Plan, be sure to note the cost of the tools used in the plan. Barn door tools can often cost more than your actual door! But, there are many clever and affordable do it yourself tools options in the tutorials mentioned below! Let us explore some DIY Barn Door Tutorials. Just click on the blue text below and check some amazing fun Barn doors. They might be different from the one shown in above picture.


If you like a large octagon table instead of a simple round table, you can consider this free DIY plan from Ana White. This table features truss supports and pedestal base which makes it extremely durable and stable. The look might unnerve you because of the angle cuts, but you can easily get this task accomplished with the right tools. The entire list of the tools and materials required are provided. Also, the instructions are very easy to follow with illustrations included. The table has the capacity for seating six people, and it can be manufactured with a budget of around $110.
Next, make your breadboard top out of four 2×8's and 1 2×10. Ana's plans call for all 2×10's, but I wanted to use 2×8's because they are easier to work with. I don't have a photo of the process, but if you go to the 11:18 mark on the video below you can see the process involved with attaching the top boards. You will need a Kreg Jig and 2.5″ Kreg screws for this process. Once the top is assembled, center it on the base and attach to the base from unnderneath. Use 4.5″ screws to connect the 4×4's to the top and 2 or 2.5″ screws to anchor the top to the 2×4 horizontal boards.
In regards to flattening the top, another technique would be take a pencil (soft lead) and lightly draw some big lazy squiggles across the top - enough so that there is a line every few inches. Then, use either a jointer plane or a belt sander to flatten the top until the squiggles are gone. The lines give you a reference to what is high and what is low - and when you are finished in a particular area. With the jointer plane, you want to stroke at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood, and with a belt sander, you want to keep the sander flat on it's platen (don't let it tilt and dig in) and use wide, arcing, sideways sweeps with very light pressure - again at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood - never let the sander start or stop when in contact with the surface. In both cases, finish with light sanding with either a belt sander, linear sander, or by hand, stroking in the direction of the grain. Palm sanders can leave swirls.
The items you’ll need for this project include wood board, power drill, tape measure, adhesive, etc. Read the tutorial for details on internet. Follow the steps properly to make a nice and strong wall wooden hanging. This wooden piece makes wooden clips to hold decorative items. The tutorial explains the procedure for building this beautiful wall hanging. Make sure to use only high quality items for any woodworking project.
I wanted to make more elegant jewelry tree that’s the reason I search on YouTube for a different tutorial of the jewelry hanging tree. If you are facing trouble in making jewelry hanging tree from the wood you need to try first simple one. In this link, you can see how you make this tree? And what kind of jewelry you can hang on this tree. Must watch this link so you can try easy one
I think YouTube is the best place to find different tutorials. It totally depends on your choice that what shape you is selected for Dice. You can make two different shapes of wooden dice that is rounded or square. You can also put different colors in dice to show the uniqueness of DIY wooden art. Here is one more link to understand the step by step link.
It's nice to be on your site getting plans and building projects.  I was so inspired by you I went out and bought Ryobi tools, and have since built 3 projects all on http://www.Ana-White.com/ by you.  I loved building the Potting Table, and better yet my Mother loved it when I gave it to her as a gift.  I am now working on the Farm House style Table and Benches.  I can't wait to see how they turn out!  
Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >

To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.

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