Liz, Great job on your new table and benches. They really look great. Love the chandelier also. Wanted to let you know that after I saw your tutorial on the board and batten in your living room and dining room, it really inspired me. I said to myself, “I can do that.” So, with that in mind, I am just finishing up board and batten in my laundry room. It was really an easy project and I love the results. It really perks up a drab old laundry room. I ended up doing all the work myself. The only help I asked my husband for, was with the nail gun, as we had to really get into some tight places. All in all, though, I am very pleased with it. Thanks for the idea.
8. Size a tenon on the cap piece to fit the ball’s hole. Undercut its shoulders, too. The cap piece, as shown here, is glued into a shallow hole turned into the face of a waste block. Shape the cap, then part it off the waste block. To clean up the tip, reverse the cap and push the tenon into a new hole in the waste block. Finish the cap on the lathe, then remove it and drill a small, shallow hole for the hanging wire.
If you are looking for a simple design for making your farmhouse table where you can have additional space to make more people sit, this plan could be ideal for you. The benches give you this option to allow a few more people to squeeze in. This table fits excellently in your contemporary space. This plan can be executed by any beginner, and you are also provided with square sized table and benches.
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.

The bill of materials below assumes all the lumber is good. You should buy extra lumber to be able to leave out pieces with defects in them. In general, its best to buy wider pieces of lumber and rip them into narrower pieces, such as buying 2x6 and ripping the 2x3's out of them. You get much better lumber that way. It may be better to buy five 2x10x8' instead of the parts marked with an asterisk, and cut everything from those.
For this lesson on milling lumber, we headed out to the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking, where instructor Bob Van Dyke demonstrated the classic sequence used to prepare rough lumber with power tools. Sometimes referred to by the acronym "FEE" (faces, edges, ends) the sequence involves flattening one face of the board on a jointer and then creating a parallel, flat opposing face with a thickness planer. After the faces are flat and parallel, square one edge with a jointer and then rip the other edge parallel on a tablesaw. Finally, crosscut the board to length with a miter gauge on the tablesaw.
In this month’s woodworking project demonstration, George Vondriska teaches you the step-by-step process for building a coat tree that will look great in your home or workshop. He demonstrates the simple techniques for installing wrought-iron hooks, crafting the coat tree’s feet, and quarter sawing to achieve that beautiful face grain on all four sides.
To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.
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