I just discovered your site and I’m enamored! You are truly gifted and I love your style. This post really spoke to me because 1. I have sons too 2. We are just about to re-do our kitchen table 3. I just wrote a whole post about our kitchen table on my website. I feel like the kitchen table really is a sacred place for family and it’s beautiful that you built yours together. If you want to read my kitchen table post, check it out at http://kirstenjoyhobbs.weebly.com/homemaker/the-kitchen-table-a-horror-story. Cheers 🙂
This Welcome Farmhouse Sign post is sponsored by The Home Depot. I have been compensated for my time and provided with product. All ideas and opinions are my own. This post contains some affiliate links for your convenience. Click here to read my full disclosure policy. Farmhouse style wood signs are a fun way to personalize your space. They are fairly easy to make yourself … [Read more...]

In regards to your breadboard ends: You might be able to get away with what you did depending on how dramatic the humidity difference between seasons is in your area, but in the future, you might want to elongate your dowel holes in the tongue of the joint - all but the center hole. Specifically, you want to put a pin in the center of the table end (no hole elongation) and then elongate the holes on either side - maybe 1/16" to each side of center (it's OK to glue the center like you did). This allows the center pin to keep the board centered (duh) and then allows the table top to grow and shrink across it's width without putting undue stress on the breadboard ends. This is important because wood expands/contracts across it's grain significantly more than it does along it's length, so when you have a joint where end grain meets side grain (as in your breadboard ends) NOT taking this into account can mean that your project disassembles itself - or at least becomes "rickety" as the expansion/contraction cycle loosens the joint. The amount of growth you can expect is determined by wood species, initial moisture content of the wood, and humidity change across seasons. There are online references you can check to see how much you would want to elongate those holes.

As you hear the term “farmhouse table”, you think about a traditional table. Moreover, if you like the traditional style of your furniture, this is a perfect DIY plan from Popular Mechanics for your farmhouse table. The design is very basic, and you can easily make this table even if this is your first woodworking project. The detailed instructions with illustrations are provided along with the materials and tools required to accomplish the task. This table offers enough space for at least six people to sit comfortably and it will be one of the greatest additions to your dining space.
Some friends of ours have been wanting a DIY farmhouse table for some time now. After hearing about their shopping trip and the prices they were looking at spending on one I felt obligated to step in and make this one of my next DIY projects. My buddy Jake has no experience with power tools whatsoever, bless his heart. So, you’re in for a special treat with this one as you will get to see Jake build this table from scratch with no power tool experience! With a little guidance from me of course.
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Build your own furniture, a dream of many but a reality for few. In this video I show you how I make farm tables. This is one made for a customer for a new house. It's 10 feet long and made from red oak, sawn from a dead standing tree. The base is made from spruce and yellow pine. It is constructed with mortise and tenon joints, using a hollow chisel mortiser and a tenon jig I made for the table saw.


I keep looking for a printable version of both your table and benches. I can’t seem to find them. I am hoping that you can email them to me – I want my brother-in-law to help me make the table and benches. If you don’t have the plans do you recommend I just copy and paste your information off into word or something. Thanks so much for your help – this is exactly what I have been looking for!


After cutting the rabbet joints, we walk you through the glue-up and assembly of the box. This critical stage in the process involves applying glue to the box parts and using clamps to hold the parts together while the glue dries. The assembly and glue-up tips that we detail in this episode -- and our companion article -- can apply to the assembly of any woodworking project. 

A 1914 book which treats, in a most practical and fascinating manner all subjects pertaining to the "King of Trades"; showing the care and use of tools; drawing; designing; and the laying out of work. The principles involved in the building of various kinds of structures, and the rudiments of architecture. It contains over two hundred and fifty illustrations made especially for this work, and includes also a complete glossary of the technical terms used in the art. The most comprehensive volume on this subject ever published for boys.

So, what is a warping board? It is a very basic frame (that can be joined together by any number of methods) with a bunch of pegs poking out of it. Weavers use it as a quick and easy way to measure out a great many pieces of string or yarn, all of the same length. These are then installed into the loom as the warp, hence the name warping board. It all sounds very simple, and looks that way too, unless you approach the design scientifically – my usual mistake.
The table top was then sealed with multiple coats of Varathane for protection.   We chose not to add a stain to the top because its natural coloring is gorgeous already.  There are shades of browns and grays in the wood along with saw marks from the original milling, knots, and grooves that you would come to expect from a reclaimed barn wood table.
About the video, your opening photo showed a leg pedestal so I though your first "mistake" would be about the built-in stress points inherent in that particular design. The timbers are quite robust so it is probably not an issue for everyday use, however the side stresses pressing down on the table's front and rear edges would be concentrated angularly at the center mortise and tenon location on the vertical posts. This could lead to cracks developing at those locations in time, depending on the loads placed on the table. I suggest a back-to-back "capital letter K" design for future tables that would distribute the loads more evenly across the timbers and avoid stress cracks.
The shop you see in the layout is my current setup and has evolved over many years to accommodate most importantly the acquisition of newer equipment but also better work flow. It is a free standing two story traditional barn style with office and storage space on the second level. Lumber and supplies are moved in and out of the shop through the front overhead door. To the left of the door are the lumber and plywood storage racks. Across from the lumber rack and to the right of the overhead door is the radial arm saw, miter saw and mortise utilizing a single fence system for all operations. Below and above these are cabinets and storage for misc. power hand tools.
There’s no denying the value of a handmade gift. There’s still time to make a project and have it ready to give as a gift this holiday season. Here are twenty woodworking projects that would make great holiday gifts for a wide range of people. Most are not difficult and some can be completed in a day. You can probably build a few of them with scraps you have around your shop. Just click on the project name to go to the full project article.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
Looking for a great gift for a friend or family member or maybe a Christmas gift? Recommended woodwork projects include a turned wood box with a lid or how to make a jewlery box. New to woodworking? Great! Check out these simple beginner’s woodworking projects. No matter the DIY woodworking project you can find your next gift idea in the wood craft videos listed below.
Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
In the grand scheme of history, power woodworking tools are a very recent innovation. However, it is hard to imagine modern woodworking without the use of power tools. That being said, one doesn't need a shop full of expensive woodworking machines to be an effective woodworker. When building a workshop, there are seven power tools to focus on first:
Basically, as you beginner you will need the following tools: a drill, an impact driver, a miter saw and a sander. With these tools you can cut, join and finish wood as a professional. If you want to save time and improve the quality of your work you can upgrade and buy yourself a pocket hole jig, a router, a thickness planer and a table saw. I have created a complete guide with tool recommendations and reviews HERE, so you make an informed decision.

Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.
This may be my longest post to date. But also the largest project, and I have to admit that the work itself was done by my husband and I was merely his helper.  We decided to build a farm table using reclaimed barn wood from scratch. Our first stop was to an awesome secret spot, secret because I’ve been forbidden from sharing its location, to pick out the wood. It’s really no secret, its located in New Jersey. Go ahead and google, it’s easy to find *wink* This place had a huge selection of slabs, doors, and everything wood.  Most of the wood comes from salvaged barns in Ohio!  

This box is the fifth generation of this design. After each production run of about 20 boxes, I make slight design changes to enhance the look and simplify the machining. Any hardwoods would work, but since the box uses so little lumber, I prefer to incorporate highly figured woods. For safety, ease of construction and consistent cuts, I use a jig for bevel-cutting the legs and another jig for beveling the top surface of the lid.
Beautiful set of chisels. Fairly easy to flatten and sharpen. Don't overthink the sharpening, you don't need $1000 worth of gadgets to do it. I do recommend using sandpaper to remove the lacquer before flattening/sharpening. The pouch roll is nice but I might try and add some reinforcement to the bottom of the slots as I don't like the plastic caps. I don't want razor sharp chisels shredding the pouch.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
9. Support the spindle with one hand as you cut icicle shapes. First turn a tenon at the tailstock end to fit the lower hole in the ball. Undercut the tenon’s shoulders so the icicle fits tight on the rounded bottom of the ball (Fig.A).Then turn the larger diameter cove, beads and fillets. Move downhill towards the headstock to cut the smallest diameters last. Apply a finish.
You guys did a great job – and I love that it was a family project! Your boys will probably remember that for the rest of their lives and enjoy sitting at the table because of it! I’ve been trying to convince my husband that I need to make us a nice table for our new house but he’s being stubborn… I’m going to show him your pictures so he can see how awesome it would be! Great job on your blog! I have one too where I talk about all my projects! 🙂
This is another basic farmhouse table design which you can easily build. However, the table is large with a seating capacity of at least ten people. This table is also a great addition to be in your home as it serves many purposes including storage apart from dining. The instructions are provided in two separate parts; first part includes the construction process and the second part includes the finishing touches.

Isn’t it amazing to have a wooden bangle in your hand? I am sure you would like this bangle and would love to wear it. This type of bangle is very rare and it is also very durable. It cannot be broken very easily. You can see the different designs of this bangle and can enjoy wearing it. I am sharing some of the pictures of these bangles; just have a look at these pictures and start your project. These pictures are for your help. So, have a look at these pictures for getting an idea on its making.
Have you ever heard about a chess which is made of wood? If not, then I am presenting a chess which is the most beneficial and attractive one. I am sharing its picture with you and you can make this chess very easily. The most amazing thing is that you can present it as a gift to other fellows. They would surely admire your gift. I am sharing some pictures of this chess; just have a look at these pictures. I am sure you would like these pictures.
The blade on a block plane, (click to enlarge drawing) commonly referred to as a plane iron, is mounted with the bevel side up to produce a cutting angle of about 37 degrees in a standard plane and 25 degrees in a low-angle plane. Some block planes feature an adjustable mouth, which allows the plane to be tuned for different cuts; Close the mouth and lower the blade for finish cuts or open the mouth and extend the blade for thicker rough cuts.
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