The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
I recently met  a man  known among local woodworkers for having a large workshop with a lot of tools. He offered to show me his workshop, and  take photographs of it. His workshop covers the entire basement of a large 1800 square foot bungalow. It's difficult to capture this workshop in just a few photos, so I figured I'd include a large number of photos.
With a little woodworking knowledge and use of some basic items, you can build a wonderful tissue box holder of your own. You can easily build them in bulk and then sell at good rates. Although easy, a wooden tissue box is an equally important and useful item for households. You can also make wonderful variety of wooden boxes easily at home. It is actually very easy and interesting to make. These wooden items give a classy look to your interior furnishing. This is the easiest way to spice up your tables with beautiful wooden tissue boxes. By doing this you can give style to your table settings.
In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
The shop you see in the layout is my current setup and has evolved over many years to accommodate most importantly the acquisition of newer equipment but also better work flow. It is a free standing two story traditional barn style with office and storage space on the second level. Lumber and supplies are moved in and out of the shop through the front overhead door. To the left of the door are the lumber and plywood storage racks. Across from the lumber rack and to the right of the overhead door is the radial arm saw, miter saw and mortise utilizing a single fence system for all operations. Below and above these are cabinets and storage for misc. power hand tools.

9. Support the spindle with one hand as you cut icicle shapes. First turn a tenon at the tailstock end to fit the lower hole in the ball. Undercut the tenon’s shoulders so the icicle fits tight on the rounded bottom of the ball (Fig.A).Then turn the larger diameter cove, beads and fillets. Move downhill towards the headstock to cut the smallest diameters last. Apply a finish.
Chances are in any woodworking project, you’re going to have to connect two pieces of material. Screws are ideal for this – much better than nails – but there are hundreds of different types and sizes, all for different applications. We will review the most common types and applications so that you can quickly determine what type you will need for your project and how to use it.
I love this barnwood reclaimed table-your husband did a beautiful job! We have a coffee table and two end tables (hand-me-downs) that remind me a little of this table. They each have metal legs that have criss-cross metal bars that make shelves below, and are great for holding baskets. The tops of each were pretty rough when we inherited the tables, and lately I’ve been thinking about either sanding and then white-washing the wood, and now after seeing your pictures I’m thinking more about just sanding the tops and see how they look and maybe finishing them like you did your table!? (I think I like your idea better! How many coats of Varathane did you folks use?) Thank you so much for sharing!
A good friend celebrated a milestone birthday this year, and since he’s a real wine afficionado, I wanted to give him a few very nice bottles of wine presented in a special way. I’ve seen expensive vintage wines sold in wooden presentation boxes, but I wanted to make something that’s well beyond the ordinary. So I designed a box that presents the wine bottles by “popping them up” as the lid is opened.
It was murderously hot here in the Charm City suburbs last weekend. The heat index topped a full 115 degrees on Saturday. But fear not, the heat didn’t deter us from tackling our long-awaited shed storage shelves project. We’re excited about this project because we’ve been looking forward to sharing a plywood shelving article for some time now, and this article gives us the perfect avenue for that. In case you’ve forgotten (or more likely if you’ve just started reading here), here’s the new shed. It looks great on the outside, but without some shelving and storage hooks for tools inside, most of the interior space would go to waste.
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