Disclaimer: Almost any DIY project involves risk of some sort. Your tools, materials, and skills will vary, as will the conditions at your project site. Rogue Engineer has made every effort to be complete and accurate in the instructions provided on this website. Rogue Engineer will not assume any responsibility or liability for damages or losses sustained or incurred in the course of your project or in the use of the item you create. Always follow the manufacturer's operating instructions in the use of tools, check and follow your local building codes, and observe all commonly accepted safety precautions.
In regards to flattening the top, another technique would be take a pencil (soft lead) and lightly draw some big lazy squiggles across the top - enough so that there is a line every few inches. Then, use either a jointer plane or a belt sander to flatten the top until the squiggles are gone. The lines give you a reference to what is high and what is low - and when you are finished in a particular area. With the jointer plane, you want to stroke at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood, and with a belt sander, you want to keep the sander flat on it's platen (don't let it tilt and dig in) and use wide, arcing, sideways sweeps with very light pressure - again at about 45 degrees to the grain of the wood - never let the sander start or stop when in contact with the surface. In both cases, finish with light sanding with either a belt sander, linear sander, or by hand, stroking in the direction of the grain. Palm sanders can leave swirls.
Not every woodworking shop have sawhorses, but you'll find them a useful and versatile item to have at hand. A sawhorse can be used as a short-term table, workbench or benchtop stand, and can be use as a workbench extender or to as a temporary lumber self. Build your own sawhorses allows you to customize them to your own needs and wood shop requirements.
Often when working with wood, after cutting it up and drilling holes the surface will be unfinished with unsightly burs and splinters. This is a simple fix with a quick sanding, but with a seemingly endless amount of types and grits of sandpaper and sanding equipment this can get confusing. The main types of sanders we’ll cover are belt sanders, orbit sanders, and hand sanders.

Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8’s. Everything else was kept the same as Ana’s plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.

If your space is very limited in your living or kitchen, you will love this farmhouse table design which can also be used as a kitchen island. This feature makes it perfect for keeping it in the kitchen space. If you have some woodworking skills, consider making pocket holes without adding 2×2 supports as in the original plan which saves both money and time. In this process, you will not have to drill or cut more holes, and all the screw holes can be hidden providing a better finish.


Cut the 6-1/2-in. x 3-in. lid from the leftover board, and slice the remaining piece into 1/4-in.-thick pieces for the sides and end of the box. Glue them around the plywood floor. Cut a rabbet on three sides of the lid so it fits snugly on the box and drill a 5/8-in. hole for a finger pull. Then just add a finish and you’ve got a beautiful, useful gift. If you don’t have time to make a gift this year, consider offering to do something for the person. You could offer to sharpen their knives! Here’s how.
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Chances are in any woodworking project, you’re going to have to connect two pieces of material. Screws are ideal for this – much better than nails – but there are hundreds of different types and sizes, all for different applications. We will review the most common types and applications so that you can quickly determine what type you will need for your project and how to use it.
It's nice to be on your site getting plans and building projects.  I was so inspired by you I went out and bought Ryobi tools, and have since built 3 projects all on http://www.Ana-White.com/ by you.  I loved building the Potting Table, and better yet my Mother loved it when I gave it to her as a gift.  I am now working on the Farm House style Table and Benches.  I can't wait to see how they turn out!  
I just discovered your site and I’m enamored! You are truly gifted and I love your style. This post really spoke to me because 1. I have sons too 2. We are just about to re-do our kitchen table 3. I just wrote a whole post about our kitchen table on my website. I feel like the kitchen table really is a sacred place for family and it’s beautiful that you built yours together. If you want to read my kitchen table post, check it out at http://kirstenjoyhobbs.weebly.com/homemaker/the-kitchen-table-a-horror-story. Cheers 🙂
This basic table from Instructables is also very easy to build, and also the benches are simple in design. If you are looking to make a simple table with many seating, you can consider making this table. However, the chairs would require some good carpentry skills or you can buy them separately. It is recommended to use kiln dried lumber which can be readily available at your home store. Check for the initials KD or HT to know the type of lumber to be used.

Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
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