In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
I think this is one of the best feelings if you are successful in making wooden spoon by yourself without any trouble. You can create stylish and unique spoon at home. The only thing is that you just need to follow some steps for making a perfect spoon. In this video, you can see how simply the making of a spoon is and how much you need time for making is explained in this video.
Lumber and supplies are moved in and out of the shop through the front overhead door. To the left of the door are the lumber and plywood storage racks. Across from the lumber rack and to the right of the overhead door is the radial arm saw, miter saw and mortise utilizing a single fence system for all operations. Below and above these are cabinets and storage for misc. power hand tools. Next to the radial arm saw and in the corner is the floor drill press with accessory storage next to it for all drilling operations.  Across from the radial arm saw is a separate workstation set up with a small portable table saw and router set-up with storage underneath for routers, bits and accessories.
After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:
After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product. 
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