Cordless tools are very handy, and I love my cordless drills. However, if you are just dabbling with getting into woodworking, and you may only use your tools every six months, you may find the litium batteries dying prematurely. Litium batteries slowly self-discharge, and once fully discharged, they are permanently damaged. So if, for example, you use a cordless drill until the battery is low, put it away without recharging, and try to charge it again months later, you may find the battery no longer able to take a charge.
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Methods for skinning a cat have nothing on ways to build a bench. Explore different joinery methods and work with those that you are able to complete the best. Don't overcomplicate something when it doesn't need to be. There's a reason tools have improved, glue has gotten better, fasteners stronger, and new joinery methods have been introduced. A lot of the time the focus in woodworking is on finding shortcuts to get the same or better results. Don't let joinery snobs influence you.
Liz, Great job on your new table and benches. They really look great. Love the chandelier also. Wanted to let you know that after I saw your tutorial on the board and batten in your living room and dining room, it really inspired me. I said to myself, “I can do that.” So, with that in mind, I am just finishing up board and batten in my laundry room. It was really an easy project and I love the results. It really perks up a drab old laundry room. I ended up doing all the work myself. The only help I asked my husband for, was with the nail gun, as we had to really get into some tight places. All in all, though, I am very pleased with it. Thanks for the idea.
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While metal machinists’ straightedges are ideal for setting up woodworking machinery, their high-tolerance accuracy and weight are overkill for most woodworking tasks. For centuries, shop-made wooden straightedges handled many layout and testing chores, and the tools are still useful today. Wooden straightedges are lightweight, simple to make in any size and can be easily trued with common workshop tools. While straightedges that resemble the machinists’ versions – essentially a skinny rectangle with parallel edges – are useful, these tend to go out of square quickly as the seasons change. However, by understanding a bit about the way wood works, you can make a wooden straightedge that is both accurate and durable.
No doubt many of us would love to have a huge, 2000 square foot building devoted to woodcraft, on a wooded acreage somewhere. But there is a reality that goes with a hobby shared by numerous ordinary people: very few really have the means to set up such palatial workshops. We have our lives to lead, and engaging in such a venture is out of the reach for most, myself included. This article is dedicated to workshops for "the rest of us."
It was murderously hot here in the Charm City suburbs last weekend. The heat index topped a full 115 degrees on Saturday. But fear not, the heat didn’t deter us from tackling our long-awaited shed storage shelves project. We’re excited about this project because we’ve been looking forward to sharing a plywood shelving article for some time now, and this article gives us the perfect avenue for that. In case you’ve forgotten (or more likely if you’ve just started reading here), here’s the new shed. It looks great on the outside, but without some shelving and storage hooks for tools inside, most of the interior space would go to waste.
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