Build your own furniture, a dream of many but a reality for few. In this video I show you how I make farm tables. This is one made for a customer for a new house. It's 10 feet long and made from red oak, sawn from a dead standing tree. The base is made from spruce and yellow pine. It is constructed with mortise and tenon joints, using a hollow chisel mortiser and a tenon jig I made for the table saw.
Another way to customize the look of your table is with the top shape.  In addition to traditional rectangular and round table tops, we also offer oval and racetrack tops.  What’s that?  A racetrack table top has curved ends and straight sides whereas an oval top is curved on all sides.  As with table bases, it is important to consider form with functionality!  In addition to shape and size, all of our table tops come in standard (about 1″), thick (about 1.5- 1.75″) and extra thick (+2″) thicknesses.  Do you need an extra large table, a very narrow table or an odd shape?  All of table lengths, widths and shapes are customizable.  Just ask us if you don’t see the exact size you are looking for!

Right now, Beginning Woodworker Self, your definition of "scrap" is a shim or a 1" piece of end grain. But "scrap" means something else to lumber yard owners and purveyors of fine hard woods, like 2' lengths of thick mahogany and 8"x6" chunks of black walnut. One day, your friend Peter, who already knows how to ask for scrap, will go to a local lumber company and ask if he can buy some. The owner will tell your friend that he can take as much scrap as he can carry in his car for $100. Peter drives a VW bus, and will have the rafters of his garage filled with multi-foot lengths of cherry, mahogany, black walnut, maple, and poplar for many years to come. Ask for scrap.
This wooden sofa side table can also be made in different sizes and shapes as you can find on the internet. Some of the items you will need for this project are wooden pieces, cutter, screws, etc. We have included a video tutorial here that illustrates the process of building a wooden sofa side table. This is not the exact one that you see in the image above, but it can be modified to build any shape or design you want. The video tutorial also has English subtitles to make it easy for anyone to understand and follow the steps. 

If you are a starter, this is another design you can consider to build. The step by step instructions provided by Boxy Colonial are easy to follow, and the list of materials and tools are also provided. This farmhouse table can be used for any purpose like reading or writing, playing cards, eating, or any other activities where you need a table. Six people can easily sit at the table together.
Drill four 5/8-in.-dia. 1/2-in.-deep holes on the large disc?inside the traced circle?then use 5/8-in. dowel centers to transfer the hole locations to the underside of the small disc. Drill four 1/2-in.-deep holes on the underside of the small disc and a 1/2-in.-deep hole in the center of the top for the dowel handle. Glue in the dowels to join the discs, and glue in the handle. We drilled a wood ball for a handle knob, but a screw-on ceramic knob also provides a comfortable, attractive grip.
A good tool to get next is some sort of circular saw. A circular saw cuts a lot faster than a jigsaw, and it's easier to make a straighter cleaner cut with it. It's also a very useful tool for cutting up big sheets of plywood, even if you already have a table saw. At this point, you have enough tools for some simple projects such as this table or some storage shelving 

Creating custom picture frames for friends and family is a great gift giving project that's sure to please even those difficult to shop for gift recipients. Everyone has a special photo or keepsake they've meant to have framed. Making a custom frame to match may be the best gift of the season. Best of all, it's a quick and simple project to complete with the right tools and set up.
In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
If you like a large octagon table instead of a simple round table, you can consider this free DIY plan from Ana White. This table features truss supports and pedestal base which makes it extremely durable and stable. The look might unnerve you because of the angle cuts, but you can easily get this task accomplished with the right tools. The entire list of the tools and materials required are provided. Also, the instructions are very easy to follow with illustrations included. The table has the capacity for seating six people, and it can be manufactured with a budget of around $110.
Liz Fourez started Love Grows Wild in 2012 with a passion for interior design and homemaking and a dream to help others create a home they love.  From simple project tutorials, to holiday and entertaining ideas, to her journey renovating a 1940’s farmhouse, Liz demonstrates how to create a beautiful and inviting home with a handmade touch. She turned her signature cozy, neutral style into a best-selling book in 2016 and continues to inspire readers with her captivating photography and easy decorating ideas. Read more about Liz > > > >
I know you hate to ask for anything, but when it comes to woodworking it will bear you in good stead. You know that, when it comes to computers and carpentry, your grandfather has probably already done it. Call him and ask. Fortunately, there are also a lot of (and will be more) people online who are older than 30, many of whom are retired and lucky enough to be able to spend a lot of time online in woodworking forums answering questions instead of boring day-job office applications. They are helpful, generous and kind. You should approach them earlier and often. One of them will also point you to a veritable treasure trove of saws, and a master saw restorer and seller.
Chances are in any woodworking project, you’re going to have to connect two pieces of material. Screws are ideal for this – much better than nails – but there are hundreds of different types and sizes, all for different applications. We will review the most common types and applications so that you can quickly determine what type you will need for your project and how to use it.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
If you are searching any gift for your loved one this decoration piece is the ideal one. You can decorate it on the wall and with its good look your lounge would look great. If you are giving a gift to your family members they would surely admire you and like this gift very much. This running deer is creating an outstanding impression on the people and they tend to have it on the wall of their lounge. It would fit best in the lobby too. I am sharing some of the pictures of this dear; just have a look at these pictures.

Creativity through woodworking brings the best combination of DIY wooden Art. Any shape can easily make through the following simple steps. Keep that thing in mind that you need enough space for writing a message in this project. I just love this concept because of more beautiful work more chance of people attraction. In this video you can see the message for the whole family or choose for your friends also. For more detail check this video.
With a little wood glue and imagination, painted 2”x2” wood pieces are topped with wooden balls and then dressed with fabric and a twig shepherd’s hook. A smaller wood block, peg, and fabric make the manger in this craft from The 36th Avenue. Place inside a paper-lined crate graced with a craft paper star, and the true meaning of Christmas will quickly come to life.
While the best look of modern homestead table has been around for a short time, another harvest of farmhouse style feasting tables has been showing up of late. They are an incredible approach to join and investigate a generally present day room. The long pieces of crude wood are emotional without being overwhelming. Many combine press with recovered wood for a modern curve that is tough without being to massive.
To start, make a base assembly out of the aprons, legs, and stretchers. Attach one leg on either side of one of the short aprons. Bore two holes for pocket screws into each side of the apron's back, four in total (fig. 1). Clamp the legs to the apron, but add a ⅛-inch piece of wood to the front as a spacer (fig. 2). This will offset the face of the apron from the face of the leg, pushing it back a bit and creating a nice dimensionality. Drive the pocket screws through the apron into the leg. Repeat the same procedure for the second leg–apron assembly.
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We’ve already done rope, and now we’re on to another rustic material we love: wood! It’s as basic of a material as clay and is constantly reinvented by DIYers, crafters, artists, hackers, and carpenters. To get inspired to create our own batch of cool wooden objects, we turned to our favorite fellow makers to see what projects they’ve come up with. Scroll down for our top DIY wood project picks.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
Hand saws are a good option for making quick cuts that don’t need to be perfectly straight. They do take some muscle as they are non-powered, but are perfect for a quick job. The downside to hand-saws is you will need a different saw for each type of material you need to cut, so if you’re trying to cut wood and sheet metal, that’s an additional cost. 

A good tool to get next is some sort of circular saw. A circular saw cuts a lot faster than a jigsaw, and it's easier to make a straighter cleaner cut with it. It's also a very useful tool for cutting up big sheets of plywood, even if you already have a table saw. At this point, you have enough tools for some simple projects such as this table or some storage shelving
This time I surprised one of my favorite dice games and took it outside. I made a set of wooden dice in just a few hours, and instead of sitting in the room and doing nothing, we are taking our dice game out into the yard. With this set of wooden dice, dice games are becoming our favorite backyard game. Check out the step by step tutorial below so you can make your own.

We cut the supports 16 in. long, but you can place the second shelf at whatever height you like. Screw the end supports to the walls at each end. Use drywall anchors if you can’t hit a stud. Then mark the position of the middle supports onto the top and bottom shelves with a square and drill 5/32-in. clearance holes through the shelves. Drive 1-5/8-in. screws through the shelf into the supports. You can apply this same concept to garage storage. See how to build double-decker garage storage shelves here.


This is another basic farmhouse table design which you can easily build. However, the table is large with a seating capacity of at least ten people. This table is also a great addition to be in your home as it serves many purposes including storage apart from dining. The instructions are provided in two separate parts; first part includes the construction process and the second part includes the finishing touches.
Chances are in any woodworking project, you’re going to have to connect two pieces of material. Screws are ideal for this – much better than nails – but there are hundreds of different types and sizes, all for different applications. We will review the most common types and applications so that you can quickly determine what type you will need for your project and how to use it.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.

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Begin by cutting off a 10-in. length of the board and setting it aside. Rip the remaining 38-in. board to 6 in. wide and cut five evenly spaced saw kerfs 5/8 in. deep along one face. Crosscut the slotted board into four 9-in. pieces and glue them into a block, being careful not to slop glue into the saw kerfs (you can clean them out with a knife before the glue dries). Saw a 15-degree angle on one end and screw the plywood piece under the angled end of the block.
Per usual, I used pocket screws to fasten the table top together after applying glue to the edges.  Pic 3 shows the underside of the table.  A straight edge clamp and a circular saw were used to trim the ends of the top.  The blue masking tape helps limit splintering from the saw.  To see if the table was square, I compared the diagonal measurements across the table top.  Diagonal measurements on a square or rectangle should be equal if the piece is square on all corners.  It's not very critical on a rustic, distressed table since the table's charm comes from it's imperfections.
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