There was a time when working with woodworking was considered a waste of time. That trend has subsided with contemporary interior designing commanding a stiff price. If you have the right skills then you can surely make a career out of your skills but as they say "nothing comes easy". Woodworking is no different. If you don't have the skill, yet, start with these beginning projects.
If you don’t have a large space for dining, you can check this plan. This design from Instructables is very basic to make and can easily fit in your small space. However, it has the capacity for six people to sit together at the table. The cost depends on the type of lumber you are using; construction grade pine wood might cost around $50, and if you are using furniture grade lumber, it might cost approximately $120.
In addition to color choice ther are also many finish options.  Painted finishes can be solid, rubbed (worn) or rubbed & glazed.  For a very unique look consider a two and three color rub. Finally for any of our finishes you can choose your level of wood distressing.  To paint or to stain your table?  Perhaps wax?  Choose your level of distressing?  The choice is truly yours.  Free color samples to view in your home can be requested online from each of our product pages.  Color samples are sent out the following day. Need a custom color?  We can do that too!
Douglas fir from home improvement centers will almost always warp when you try to make a flat top. It is never dried to the same extent as hardwood and ships out for the purpose of being used as framing lumber, not furniture lumber. That said, you can do it, but buy it and let it sit in your garage for a few months or longer to let it further dry and acclimate to your environment. Even better if you plane it down after that waiting period, then allowing it to acclimate for another week or so to make it works out all of its twists prior to being turned into a top. Do you have any hardwood dealers in your area? Try visiting one and make an investment in your table...buy some good maple (soft maple is worlds harder than new douglas fir - you don't need hard maple, ie:or sugar/rock maple).
There's no better way to give thanks than to gather family and friends around an enormous table to share a feast. A farmhouse table would be the perfect spot. You could make one out of construction lumber and ordinary hardware in a couple of days. We're not talking precision woodworking here. If you can handle a circular saw and a chisel, you can do this. Farmers used to build these tables themselves, not furniture makers or carpenters, so it's okay if it turns out a bit rustic. That's half the fun. The other half is sitting down to eat at a table you built yourself.
Getting started in woodworking can seem like a daunting task. From specialty woodworking tools to identifying and understanding the different types of wood, there is so much to know that even the old-timers are still developing. But learning and experimenting are what woodworking is all about. Get started on the right foot with some essential basics about safety, tools, lumber, and traditional layout and measuring techniques.
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.

Now is where things get fun.  HomeRight sent this awesome paint sprayer and it’s a game changer.  If you haven’t read all those blog posts I’ve written before and told you about how much I hated to paint furniture, I’ll just tell you again.  I hate painting furniture.  But mainly, I hate it because I’ve always done it with a brush.  And nothing ruins a good build job like brush marks…ugh, right?
We tested this out on an old bathroom vanity - as we are over-capitalized on our home and just can't afford a full bathroom remodel. I lightly sanded the vanity, applied 4 coats of stain (allowing them to dry at least 24 hours between coats)with a foam brush, and switched out the vanity hardware. BEAUTIFUL! Our vanity looks brand new and very contemporary! This is a huge upgrade from that 90's "golden oak" color that is everywhere in our house.
This is another basic farmhouse table design which you can easily build. However, the table is large with a seating capacity of at least ten people. This table is also a great addition to be in your home as it serves many purposes including storage apart from dining. The instructions are provided in two separate parts; first part includes the construction process and the second part includes the finishing touches.
There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.
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