Hi Nancy! I only looked specifically for rectangular tables – sorry!! I do know the blog Little Red Brick House made a round farmhouse table but I couldn’t find instructions for it. Maybe reach out to her and she could give you more details? Here’s the link to her post: http://littleredbrickhouse.com/industrial-farmhouse-dining-room-makeover-one-room-challenge-reveal/ Thanks for stopping by!
This saw has changed my life. I literally cannot even tell you who I am anymore. I have been reborn, and into a world where the lion lays with the sheep in euphoric happiness and cooperation. The skies are bluer now than ever before. My tastebuds have been supercharged; my skin feels tingly all through the day; my mind has been freed and I have new purpose and resolve.

Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.
Never consider using wood from a high volume store such as Lowes or Home Depot for furniture. You will almost assuredly have serious warpage as this wood is never dried to the proper level prior to being placed in the stores for sale. I normally shoot for 7%-8% moisture content. Anything greater than that will have a tendency to warp as it continues to dry out. You need to go to a lumber yard where the boards are actually dried prior to sale. You can acquire an inexpensive meter and check the boards yourself prior to purchase. Actually, I prefer air dried lumber as opposed to kiln dried. I have let it dry for 1-2 years or more prior to using it. I don't run it through the planer until I am ready to use it. Hope this is helpful. By the way, Red Oak or Cherry makes beautiful furniture. I seldom use white oak because the stuff is really tough to work with due to its hardness. Make beautiful furniture, though!
This farmhouse table is one of the sturdiest tables that you can make. It can fit in smaller spaces but has ample space for seating four people. You can also fit in six people if you want. The benches provide that extra space and also they look great. The plans are very easy to execute. Solid oak wood is recommended for the top and turned wood legs provide a great look which you can build in about $250.
East Coast Creative provides this DIY plan to make your farmhouse table which can be used for a picnic with many guests. This gigantic table can fit 12-14 people. Though it does not have benches, the top of the table spreads out like a traditional picnic table. You can add chairs of your choice and so, if you want to add a modern twist, simply choose chairs with modern styles.
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.
In my design, I considered 3 different types of legs made from 30" long cedar 4x4s.  (You could use other types of wood including gluing three 2x4s together to make solid legs.)  The simplest design was to cut the legs to length and use the 4x4s square.  Second was to taper the two inside surfaces and third was to taper all four surfaces.  I ended up tapering all 4 sides on my bandsaw.  The cut line begins 4" from the top and removes 1/2" at the bottom.  Pic 2 shows how little I removed.  I wanted the legs to have "shape" while remaining stout in appearance and this slight taper seemed about right.  Pic 2 also shows the levelers in the bottom of these legs which were salvaged from a previous project.  I decided to leave the levelers and shortened the legs a bit.
Easygoing style Kitchen Farm Table Cultivate tables, otherwise called reap tables, once utilized as durable work surfaces for agriculturists. Today, their straightforward wooden plan settles on them magnificent decisions for the lounge area and kitchen. In the principal room, a provincial ranch table replaces a focal island in the kitchen, giving a spot to easygoing suppers.
A few days back, I was searching for some cool DIY plans. So, I got to work and ended up coming up with some easy to follow project and an awesome new ice chest cooler to have out on the deck! It was going to be perfect for summer hangouts and barbecues. It was a fun and practical plan to work on and I know you will have fun tackling select a design from this plan and start building your own. Enjoy learning how you can build a rustic cooler also sing the video tutorial and source tutorial plan!
There was a time when working with woodworking was considered a waste of time. That trend has subsided with contemporary interior designing commanding a stiff price. If you have the right skills then you can surely make a career out of your skills but as they say "nothing comes easy". Woodworking is no different. If you don't have the skill, yet, start with these beginning projects.
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.

East Coast Creative provides this DIY plan to make your farmhouse table which can be used for a picnic with many guests. This gigantic table can fit 12-14 people. Though it does not have benches, the top of the table spreads out like a traditional picnic table. You can add chairs of your choice and so, if you want to add a modern twist, simply choose chairs with modern styles.
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.
×