#00 Steel Wool and White Vinegar – Put a handful of steel wool in a jar and add white vinegar. Let the vinegar dilute the steel wool for at least a couple days. The mixture will get darker the longer you let it sit. Once diluted, simply paint the mixture on your piece. Oxidation will occur and the mixture reacts with the tannins in the wood to give it variations in color. It changed the Fir wood to dark blues, greys, browns, and black. Do not use white Pine because it will not darken much at all. 

Need a farm table for a nook?  A pedestal table table works great.  Looking to seat a lot of people?  A trestle table could be the right solution for you.  All of our base options come in a variety of design styles to fit your specific interior design requirements.  If you can’t find what you need, send as picture of what you have in mind and we may be able to design a base for you.  Not sure what base would work best for you?  Our table consultants are here to help!
Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8's. Everything else was kept the same as Ana's plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.
I love this barnwood reclaimed table-your husband did a beautiful job! We have a coffee table and two end tables (hand-me-downs) that remind me a little of this table. They each have metal legs that have criss-cross metal bars that make shelves below, and are great for holding baskets. The tops of each were pretty rough when we inherited the tables, and lately I’ve been thinking about either sanding and then white-washing the wood, and now after seeing your pictures I’m thinking more about just sanding the tops and see how they look and maybe finishing them like you did your table!? (I think I like your idea better! How many coats of Varathane did you folks use?) Thank you so much for sharing!
Now you have the knowledge of creating your dream farmhouse table of your choice. With 53 DIY Farmhouse Table Plans, consider choosing anyone which you like. Even if you are not an expert at carpentry, you can select from the simple designs that are equally stylish. If you are great at woodworking, you can consider the projects which require some expertise.
Farm tables are those warm, rustic surfaces that draw inspiration from the original harvest tables found in American homes of the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than being built by skilled and trained artisans, farm tables were assembled from large and rough planks of fir. Their construction valued sturdiness and utility over detail and refinery. Today, farm tables can bring a sense of antique charm to any home, complementing matched chairs and contemporary benches alike. Here are five DIY farmhouse table projects to inspire your next act of handyman prowess.
In addition to color choice ther are also many finish options.  Painted finishes can be solid, rubbed (worn) or rubbed & glazed.  For a very unique look consider a two and three color rub. Finally for any of our finishes you can choose your level of wood distressing.  To paint or to stain your table?  Perhaps wax?  Choose your level of distressing?  The choice is truly yours.  Free color samples to view in your home can be requested online from each of our product pages.  Color samples are sent out the following day. Need a custom color?  We can do that too!
As soon as I came across this tutorial, I didn’t wait any longer to start building one. Some of the items you need for this project are hardwood plywood, saw, glue, nails, drilling machine, etc. The video is very easy to follow for anyone with basic woodworking knowledge and experience. The first source link also includes a step by step procedure in plain English for those, who are not comfortable enough with the video tutorial.The final piece looks like the one in the image. It is absolutely loveable. The design, color and looks can also be modified to suit the surrounding area.

Here is a look at the completed table prior to staining and sealing the piece. I also created matching benches to fit this table. The plans can be found by clicking here. I modified the width so they are a total of 69″ wide. Instead of using a 2×10 for the breadboards I use 2×8's. Everything else was kept the same as Ana's plans. The inside span of my table where the benches fit in is 73″ so that left 2 inches of wiggle room on each side of the bench so it can easily slide in and out.

Beautiful set of chisels. Fairly easy to flatten and sharpen. Don't overthink the sharpening, you don't need $1000 worth of gadgets to do it. I do recommend using sandpaper to remove the lacquer before flattening/sharpening. The pouch roll is nice but I might try and add some reinforcement to the bottom of the slots as I don't like the plastic caps. I don't want razor sharp chisels shredding the pouch.


After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:
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Cut off a 21-in.-long board for the shelves, rip it in the middle to make two shelves, and cut 45-degree bevels on the two long front edges with a router or table saw. Bevel the ends of the other board, cut dadoes, which are grooves cut into the wood with a router or a table saw with a dado blade, cross- wise (cut a dado on scrap and test-fit the shelves first!) and cut it into four narrower boards, two at 1-3/8 in. wide and two at 4 in.
From my point of view, I think this is really a different project because normally you will find only one wooden item like a chair, or a table, but in this project, you will find two wooden items. The combination of table and chair is really beneficial for me. I wanted to try something different project from my daily routine life and here in this image, you will find the full-size image of this project so you came to know that I am successful in making chair plus table project.
Whether your work area is a dedicated shop or a temporary cleared space in the basement or garage safety has to be the number one concern. A clean shop is a safe shop, spend a few minutes at the end of the day picking up and sweeping the floor. This not only cleans your surroundings, it also clears your mind, the solution to that problem you had earlier may suddenly appear.

There was one crack which required stabilization to prevent further splitting.  On an old piece of wood there is nothing more beautiful than a contrasting butterfly inlay to lock the pieces together.  Alternatively you could glue and clamp the split, however it is hard to get enough glue into the crack and an inlay looks much better.  I used a piece of bloodwood and an inlay jig on my router for the butterfly.  This was the first time I've tried inlay and it was very easy.  While the butterfly is beautiful & interesting, it acts functionally as 2 opposing wedges to prevent the crack from widening.  The last pic shows the finished product.


Farm tables are those warm, rustic surfaces that draw inspiration from the original harvest tables found in American homes of the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than being built by skilled and trained artisans, farm tables were assembled from large and rough planks of fir. Their construction valued sturdiness and utility over detail and refinery. Today, farm tables can bring a sense of antique charm to any home, complementing matched chairs and contemporary benches alike. Here are five DIY farmhouse table projects to inspire your next act of handyman prowess.

We are moving into the new house, but with so many, many functional projects to tackle (like closets and pantry cabinets), a beautiful dining table is way down on the priority list.  But still, I insisited we need a dining table to move in.  Once you give in to the kids eating on the couch, you're done ... or at the very least have to be the bad guy and retrain the family.  
If you like a large octagon table instead of a simple round table, you can consider this free DIY plan from Ana White. This table features truss supports and pedestal base which makes it extremely durable and stable. The look might unnerve you because of the angle cuts, but you can easily get this task accomplished with the right tools. The entire list of the tools and materials required are provided. Also, the instructions are very easy to follow with illustrations included. The table has the capacity for seating six people, and it can be manufactured with a budget of around $110.
In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
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