Farmhouse tables are generally designed to be large, but this plan from Addicted2DIY is unique for providing a seating capacity of 10 people. For holidays or parties, if you are inviting a lot of guests, your farmhouse table will be a perfect seating for all enjoying meals together. Of course, you need to have that huge space in your kitchen or living area to keep this table.
Our farmhouse tables are offered in collections unique to each of our workshops.  Each workshop and collection focus on a specific style, wood and finish.  Want a reclaimed wood table?  Our Reclaimed Barn Wood Dining Tables and Old Pine Dining Tables are just what you are looking for. Want a more polished look?  Check out our Hampton’s, Country Classics or Carolina Coastal Dining Tables.  Country Farm Tables offer  pine, maple and oak rustic farmhouse tables including a fully planked table top option.  If you are interested in exploring and comparing different woods for your table, check out The Wood Database and this wood hardeness chart.  Color samples are available in the specific wood and finish from each workshop collection.  All of our tables are made right here in the USA just for you.  Not sure what table is best for you?  Let us help compare all the collections and options.
If you are a starter, this is another design you can consider to build. The step by step instructions provided by Boxy Colonial are easy to follow, and the list of materials and tools are also provided. This farmhouse table can be used for any purpose like reading or writing, playing cards, eating, or any other activities where you need a table. Six people can easily sit at the table together.
To make the top, align the three pieces of 2 x 12. Fit them as tightly together as you can. Bore four pocket-screw holes through the bottom faces of the top pieces, then spread glue on each adjoining edge. With the pieces clamped together so that the ends are flush, fasten with 2½-inch pocket screws. Glue will squeeze out of the joint. Wait a few minutes for the glue to get rubbery, then shave it off with a sharp chisel. Keep the top flat as it dries—I like to clamp cauls across both ends to add stability. Cauls are 2 x 4s or other pieces of stout wood turned on their edges.
The router might just be the most versatile woodworking power tool there is and it's a great first tool for beginner woodworkers. When set up properly and safely handled, a router can do everything from cutting joinery to shaping parts. Just be sure you understand the basic safety procedures and read the tool's manual if you're new to using a router.
There was a time when working with woodworking was considered a waste of time. That trend has subsided with contemporary interior designing commanding a stiff price. If you have the right skills then you can surely make a career out of your skills but as they say "nothing comes easy". Woodworking is no different. If you don't have the skill, yet, start with these beginning projects.
We will suggest you select the simple Birdhouse if you are new at woodworking but be sure to select its design with respect to the place where you are going to hang/place it. One of our simple Birdhouse tutorials will help you building one. We have managed to include a source tutorial below that will help you to understand illustrates and the instruction to building a simple Birdhouse.
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Now you have the knowledge of creating your dream farmhouse table of your choice. With 53 DIY Farmhouse Table Plans, consider choosing anyone which you like. Even if you are not an expert at carpentry, you can select from the simple designs that are equally stylish. If you are great at woodworking, you can consider the projects which require some expertise.
The original plans for the project are from Ana White's website, who has hundreds of free plans available. I modified the table by making the table wider and longer. The larger size provides more space to spread out and for food or a centerpiece in the middle. This table has been a conversation piece and has worked great for our dinner parties and meals. This farmhouse table will last for years and will be able to be passed on to family members for generations. Whitney from Shanty-2-Chic also has a post about creating this table and she collaborated with Ana-White on her project.

I used a #00 Steel Wool and White Vinegar solution to patina the wood and give it an aged look. Put a good handful of steel wool in a jar and add white vinegar. Let the vinegar dilute the steel wool for at least 3 to 4 days. The mixture will get darker the longer you let it sit. I let mine sit for a full week. Once diluted, simply brush the mixture on your piece. Oxidation will occur as the mixture reacts with the tannins in the wood to give it variations in color. It changed the Fir wood to dark blues, greys, browns, and black. Do not use white Pine because it will not darken much at all. If you'd rather use a stain, Minwax has some great choices to choose from. A couple of my favorites are Special Walnut, Dark Walnut, Provincial, Weathered Grey, and Golden Oak.

Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.
Don't believe the mainstream thinking that hand tools are irrelevant, too slow to be useful, or less effective than power tools. Ignore, or at least take with a grain of salt, the power tool devotees who will say "There's a reason they invented power tools, ya know!" Your "shop" is a bench attached to the inside of a coat-closet door in a one-room studio apartment right now. Power tools are going to bother that nice med student next door, and that closet shop doesn't have any ventilation for the amount of dust you'll produce. Hand tools can be more efficient (in speed, quick access, storage, and lack of set up), they're quieter, and the pleasure of silence afforded by quiet hand tools--just a few soft noises produced by your tools--is a pleasure not to be overlooked. They're portable and will move with you, you'll learn more about how different types of wood behave, and, when you run into one of those power tool zealots, just go over to Todd's house and watch a few episodes of The Woodwright's Shop to get your respect for hand tools back in check.
I just discovered your site and I’m enamored! You are truly gifted and I love your style. This post really spoke to me because 1. I have sons too 2. We are just about to re-do our kitchen table 3. I just wrote a whole post about our kitchen table on my website. I feel like the kitchen table really is a sacred place for family and it’s beautiful that you built yours together. If you want to read my kitchen table post, check it out at http://kirstenjoyhobbs.weebly.com/homemaker/the-kitchen-table-a-horror-story. Cheers 🙂
To finish the table, I first sanded then added a little bit of distressing. Okay… A LOT of distressing. This step was probably the boys’ favorite, because I handed them each a large rock and let them go to town banging the heck out of the table. I wanted the table to look like it’s been around for generations, and all the little nicks and dings add SO much character to the wood.

The article explains step by step process for making this awesome piece of wooden art. You need are a few pieces of wooden planks, a saw, screws and plates. I must remind you here that a bit of woodworking skill are needed here too. This DIY project is fun and good sport at the same time. It is as easy on the eyes as it is to build one. If you don’t fancy written instructions, a wide variety of videos on the internet are available to help you understand its making.You can easily make the baby cots by joining equal size wooden strips in a specific manner.
I just discovered your site and I’m enamored! You are truly gifted and I love your style. This post really spoke to me because 1. I have sons too 2. We are just about to re-do our kitchen table 3. I just wrote a whole post about our kitchen table on my website. I feel like the kitchen table really is a sacred place for family and it’s beautiful that you built yours together. If you want to read my kitchen table post, check it out at http://kirstenjoyhobbs.weebly.com/homemaker/the-kitchen-table-a-horror-story. Cheers 🙂
To start, you'll want to cut out the pieces. Crosscut the top pieces, breadboard ends, stretchers, and legs. Note that the breadboard ends are slightly wider than the tabletop. This is a rustic detail with a practical aspect. It will allow the top to expand and contract with humidity and never be wider than the breadboard ends. There is also a slight overhang on the stretchers, for a similar reason. When you cut the legs, double-check that the length is a good fit for your dining-room chairs, especially if any of them have arms. Chairs with arms should be able to easily slide under the table's aprons.
In regards to your breadboard ends: You might be able to get away with what you did depending on how dramatic the humidity difference between seasons is in your area, but in the future, you might want to elongate your dowel holes in the tongue of the joint - all but the center hole. Specifically, you want to put a pin in the center of the table end (no hole elongation) and then elongate the holes on either side - maybe 1/16" to each side of center (it's OK to glue the center like you did). This allows the center pin to keep the board centered (duh) and then allows the table top to grow and shrink across it's width without putting undue stress on the breadboard ends. This is important because wood expands/contracts across it's grain significantly more than it does along it's length, so when you have a joint where end grain meets side grain (as in your breadboard ends) NOT taking this into account can mean that your project disassembles itself - or at least becomes "rickety" as the expansion/contraction cycle loosens the joint. The amount of growth you can expect is determined by wood species, initial moisture content of the wood, and humidity change across seasons. There are online references you can check to see how much you would want to elongate those holes.
Initially I thought a wine rack would be a finicky project to create, with the necessity of holding the bottles at a certain angle, etc. However, this ended up being a quick, easy and fun build. The shape of the bottles lets them rest on the rack at the correct angle (which is really only important when you are going to let your wine age). The simplicity of the design also allows you to see the labels on the bottles.
Disclaimer: Although it is my intention to provide accurate plans and clear instructions, not all plans have been tried and tested. Using plans or information found on SawdustGirl.com indicates that you agree with the Terms of Use policy and will accept full responsibility for the process and outcome of any project you attempt. All plans are for private use only. Plans and information published on SawdustGirl.com may not be reproduced, republished or distributed in any manner without written permission from Sandra Powell, Sawdust Girl. Actual projects built using Sawdust Girl plans may be published on your own site without instructions or "tutorial" as long as you provide a link to my original post with full post title or "SawdustGirl.com" as link title.
With sharp hand tools and unforgiving power tools, woodworking can be a dangerous activity. By following some basic safety rules, though, you can considerably reduce the risk of injury. In order to be effective, safety rules must be implemented every time—no exceptions. Committing to making safety a habit increases your enjoyment and lowers the chance of injury (or worse) while woodworking.
If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
Here’s a traditional Swedish farm accessory for gunk-laden soles. The dimensions are not critical, but be sure the edges of the slats are fairly sharp?they’re what makes the boot scraper work. Cut slats to length, then cut triangular openings on the side of a pair of 2x2s. A radial arm saw works well for this, but a table saw or band saw will also make the cut. Trim the 2x2s to length, predrill, and use galvanized screws to attach the slats from underneath. If you prefer a boot cleaner that has brushes, check out this clever project.

Hand saws are a good option for making quick cuts that don’t need to be perfectly straight. They do take some muscle as they are non-powered, but are perfect for a quick job. The downside to hand-saws is you will need a different saw for each type of material you need to cut, so if you’re trying to cut wood and sheet metal, that’s an additional cost.
After we got all our aggression out on the table, I applied a coat of Minwax pre-stain wood conditioner followed by a custom stain I came up with. I’ve purchased several “gray” stains that are supposed to give the wood a weathered, rustic look, but no matter how many coats I add, the gray barely colors the wood at all. I wanted the table to still be light enough to show all the wood grain, but have that old, weathered look to it, and this is the perfect mix I came up with:
You guys did a great job – and I love that it was a family project! Your boys will probably remember that for the rest of their lives and enjoy sitting at the table because of it! I’ve been trying to convince my husband that I need to make us a nice table for our new house but he’s being stubborn… I’m going to show him your pictures so he can see how awesome it would be! Great job on your blog! I have one too where I talk about all my projects! 🙂
In my design, I considered 3 different types of legs made from 30" long cedar 4x4s.  (You could use other types of wood including gluing three 2x4s together to make solid legs.)  The simplest design was to cut the legs to length and use the 4x4s square.  Second was to taper the two inside surfaces and third was to taper all four surfaces.  I ended up tapering all 4 sides on my bandsaw.  The cut line begins 4" from the top and removes 1/2" at the bottom.  Pic 2 shows how little I removed.  I wanted the legs to have "shape" while remaining stout in appearance and this slight taper seemed about right.  Pic 2 also shows the levelers in the bottom of these legs which were salvaged from a previous project.  I decided to leave the levelers and shortened the legs a bit.
Because these legs were salvaged they had old screw holes in them which were filled prior to painting.  In retrospect, it probably would have looked cool to just leave them.  I lightly sanded the legs with 100 & 150 grit sandpaper which smoothed them without removing all the saw marks.  One coat of chalk paint and 2 coats of clear Briwax was used to finish the legs.  Briwax yellows the finish a bit which aged the paint nicely.  Between coats of Briwax I sanded through the paint on some of the edges with 100 grit paper to show wear.  

The most useful stationary tools are a drill press and a table saw. For the longest time, I only had a cheap old contractor saw, and only a very small drill press, but I made do with those. The difference between a good drill press and a cheap drill press is much smaller than the difference between a cheap drill press and no drill press, so don't wait until you can afford the perfect one.
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