In episode 10 of our series, Getting Started in Woodworking, we complete our first season with a demonstration on how to apply an oil-and-wax wood finish. This finishing recipe is extremely simple and very effective. It will work for about 95 percent of the projects most woodworkers build; the only exceptions are surfaces that need to take a lot of abuse, such as a dining table tabletop.
Learning from the ideas of other woodworkers, while avoiding their mistakes is an excellent way to design and set-up your own shop layout. Setting up a woodworking shop as a hobby place, or for a some one more serious, who even may venture off into some sort of woodworking business; is not as easy as it might sound. Knowing the correct steps to follow will save you time and money, but it will also save you a lot of stress down the road. 

If you have limited space but want to have a full-sized farmhouse table, this table plan is perfect for you and is a gorgeous one. However, this plan requires some carpentry skills, and though it is designed to be thin, it has the capacity for seating six people. A metal pipe is attached to the inside of the legs reaching across the bottom which makes the table sturdy without any chance of wobbling. If you place contrasting chairs, the table looks even more splendid.
To inset the aprons 3/4" from the outer surface of the legs I made a spacer from 2 pieces of plywood.  This little jig made it easy to keep the distances uniform and also secure the apron to the leg while fastening.  Pic 3 illustrates how the jig, apron and leg are clamped together for fastening.  Each apron end is held by three 2 1/2" pocket screws.  The pocket holes were made using a Kreg pocket hole jig.  I assembled the short ends first and then the rest of the table base making sure the kerf (for clips) was along the top edge.  Since this is a long table I also added a cross piece in the middle of the table using pocket screws.
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